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Recent Seminars for the Master's Program

The graduate-level curriculum in our program is based on seminar-style courses that encourage student research and discussion. These small and intesive courses ensure that each student in the graduate program receives individual attention and guidance. As faculty will address the most cutting-edge topics and current research in their graduate seminars, the titles and contents of these courses will change from term to term. Below, you can view a sampling of courses offered in current and previous terms.

** Please e-mail the listed instructor for permission to join the course.  Then forward correspondence to vaponte@usf.edu for registration permit to be issued.**

Fall 2016 Seminars for M.A. and Ph.D. Students

HIS 6112-904: “Analysis of Historical Knowledge”
CRN# 93259                        
Instructor: Dr. Fontaine
Wed. 6:00 - 9:45pm  SOC 255
dfontaine@usf.edu

This is a course designed to introduce students entering the history graduate program to some of the common methodological and interpretive issues involved in writing history. It is a course about history as a field of knowledge. This is not a course about one particular historical subject but instead spans time and place to explore some of the intellectual assumptions that inform the kinds of stories historians tell about the past.  Learning about the varied analytical tools historians have at their disposal will provide you with a foundation from which to think about, read about, and write about history from a more informed, sophisticated, and critical perspective. This course is required for all entering graduate students unless they have obtained a waiver from the Graduate Director.

 

HIS 6939/7939-011 ”Capitalism and Empire”
MA CRN# 87976     PhD CRN# 91111
Instructor: Dr. Boterbloem
Thurs. 10:00am - 1:45pm   SOC 254
 cboterbl@usf.edu
This course will investigate the emergence of European empires in the Early Modern and Modern eras and its link with developing global capitalism. Works discussed may include Immanuel Wallerstein's Modern World System; The First Modern Economy by de Vries and van der Woude; The Industrious Revolution by Jan de Vries; works by William H. McNeill; J.A. Hobson's Imperialism; and Lenin's Imperialism: The Highest State of Capitalism; as well as more specific studies of empire and capitalism in the Dutch Republic, Great Britain, France, Germany, Japan and the United States. Participants are expected to write a 20-25 page research essay studying the nexus of capitalism and empire in the history of one or two countries.


HIS 6939/7939-933   Society, Culture and Politics in Early Modern Europe (1400-1800) 
MA CRN# 94052    PhD   CRN# 94053
Instructor:   Dr. Benadusi
Thurs. 6:00pm-9:45pm  SOC 291
benadusi@usf.edu

This seminar is both about empirical historical research that focuses on place and time and about critical approaches to studying and writing history. In the past seventy years, historians of pre-modern Europe have abandoned the old Marxist idea that all social and cultural forms, relationships, and identities were dependent on and derived from the particular economic system of a given era. Instead, borrowing from different disciplines such as, among others, cultural anthropology, historical sociology, literary studies, visual analysis and feminist theories, they have argued that people collectively both shaped and were shaped by social and cultural forms as well as by the broad economic and political developments that characterized the period between 1400 and 1800. In the course of the semester we will place emphasis on ‘culture’ as means to understand how people, as individual and collectivities, negotiated and organized their multilayered experiences. We will also explore how emphasis on ‘culture’ has lead to a reevaluation of the broad historical developments of the times such as state building, colonial expansion and domination, urbanization, capitalism, scientific etc. Another important goal of the seminar is also to rethink pre-modern European history to include definition of ‘western,’ issues of otherness and the cultural processes of ‘othering,’ and hence to incorporate a ‘global turn’ into the discussion.
Graduate students who do not focus on pre-modern Europe should benefit from this seminar for its dual emphasis on critical approaches to studying and writing history and empirical historical research that focuses on place and time. I will provide the necessary material to those students who need to refresh their background in early modern European history.
Requirements: class discussion and participation; weekly one-page reaction or position papers; a final research or historiographical paper Examples of topics for weekly meetings: “Capitalism and Patriarchy,” “Meaning and Rituals,” “Community and Religion,” Creating Contexts/Breaking Boundaries,” “Self-Fashioning, Story Telling and Absolutism,” “Orality, Literacy, and Village Life,” …
Readings combine articles (uploaded to canvas) and books. These are potential selections for readings but students should not buy them yet:

  • Martha Howell, Women, Production and Patriarchy in Late Medieval Cities (1990)
  • Carlo Ginzburg, The Cheese and the Worms (1976; English 1980)
  • Pamela Smith, “Why Write a Book? From Lived Experience to the Written Word in Early Modern Europe” (2010) 
  • Robert Darnton, The Great Cat Massacre And Other Episodes in French Cultural History (1984)
  • Paula Findlen, Possessing Nature: Museums, Collecting, and Scientific Culture in Early Modern Italy (1994)
  • Dipesh Chakrabart, Provincializing Europe: postcolonial thought and historical difference (2000), selected parts.
  • Alix Cooper, Inventing the Indigenous: Local Knowledge and Natural History in Early Modern Europe (2007)
  • Francesca Trivellato, The Familiarity of Strangers. The Sephardic Diaspora, Livorno, and Cross-Cultural Trade in the Early Modern Period (2009)

 

HIS 6939/7939-931   “ Modern US in Global Perspective ”
MA   CRN# 94049      PhD   CRN#  94050 
Instructor:  Dr. Prince
Tues. 6:00pm - 9:45pm  SOC 254
ksp@usf.edu

This course is a readings seminar in modern U.S. History, circa 1865-present. As the name suggests, several of the readings place the history of the U.S. in a global context. Possible topics of study include: race and gender in comparative context, U.S. Empire after 1898, the rise of modern capitalism, labor strife, the global 1960s, popular culture, memory and public history. This course is suitable for MA and PhD students studying any period in U.S. History, as well as for students focusing on the modern history of other parts of the world, particularly Europe and Latin America.

 

HIS 6939/7939-936   “Atlantic Modernities”
MA CRN# 93575  PhD  CRN# 93576
Instructor:  Dr. Connolly
Mon. 6:00pm - 9:45pm  SOC 255
bconnolly@usf.edu

Twenty years ago, Paul Gilroy published his landmark work, The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciouness, in which he offered “a heartfelt plea against the closure of the categories with which we conduct our political lives…The history of the black Atlantic yields a course of lessons as to the instability and mutability of identified which are always unfinished, always being remade.”  In this course we will take up Gilroy’s challenge by placing the relatively new spatial heuristic of the “Atlantic” in productive tension with the old temporal designation “modernity.”  Is there an Atlantic modernity?  Are there multiple modernities, multiple Atlantics?  We will trace this problem across the uneven histories of the long nineteenth century, with attention paid to slavery, race, capitalism, and religion.

Potential Readings (Please do not purchase until the syllabus is finalized)
Paul Gilroy, The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness
Ian Baucom, Specters of the Atlantic: Finance Capital, Slavery, and the Philosophy of History
Edward Andrews, Native Apostles: Black and Indian Missionaries in the British Atlantic
Andrew Zimmerman, Alabama in Africa: Booker T. Washington, the German Empire, and the Globalization of the New South
Ada Ferrer, Freedom’s Mirror: Cuba and Haiti in the Age of Revolution
Laurent Dubois, A Colony of Citizens: Revolution and Slave Emancipation in the French Caribbean, 1787-1804
James H. Sweet, Domingos Álvares, African Healing, and the Intellectual History of the Atlantic World
Saidiya Hartman, Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route

 

HIS 6939/7939-010  “Medieval Egypt and North Africa”
CRN#  94819                                   
Instructor: Dr. Decker
Time: Tues. 2:00pm - 5:45pm SOC 255
mjdecker@usf.edu

 In Medieval Egypt and North Africa we will explore the period ca 400-1500 in Egypt and the Maghreb (western North Africa). Among the themes we will explore: the social and cultural history of Byzantine Egypt, Christianization and pagan responses, the rise of Coptic identity and its expression. We will also explore the arrival of Islam in Egypt and understand the political and social history of the early Islamic dynasties. When we turn our attention to North Africa, the main issues we will examine are the rise of Berber polities, Ibadi Islam and slavery, Berber cultural expressions and their interaction with Romano-Africans. Christian North Africa and its social and religious upheavals from the fifth century will also be examined. We will also study the arrival of Islam in the west and the cultural changes that accompanied it and relations between medieval North Africans and Latins and Byzantines. Among the authors we will read are selections of Egyptian and African primary sources, including al-Idrisi, Ibn Khaldun, Ibn Battuta, the Cairo Geniza, and papyri documents illustrating daily life.

  

HIS 6939-908 “History of Consumer Culture”
CRN   94565      PhD student - permission needs to be granted by Dr. Johnson
Instructor: Dr. Johnson
Tues. 6:00pm - 9:45pm  SOC 255
davidjohnson@usf.edu

This course offers a study of the historiographical literature on consumer culture in modern American society. We will look at key moments and issues in the construction of a modern consumer society, such as the development of mass markets, advertising, and the department store. More theoretically, we will examine the relationship between consumer culture and identity and community formation. Is consumer culture—often equated with “mass consumption”—inherently oppressive to individuals? (Reading Marx, Baudrillard and Anderson) Can one’s role as a consumer be liberating or empowering? What is the relationship between one’s role as a political actor (“citizen”) and an economic actor (“consumer”)?  How has purchasing or refusing to purchase been used as a tool by minority communities?  How does using the lens of consumer culture change our view of history?  Students will acquire hands-on experience in producing an original research paper on a particular aspect of consumer culture. Students interested in material and consumer culture from any time period or region are welcome.
Tentative Reading List:
William Leach, Land of Desire:  Merchants, Power, and the Rise of a New American Culture
Susan Strasser, Satisfaction GuaranteedThe Making of the American Mass Market
Lizabeth Cohen, A Consumers’ Republic: The Politics of Mass Consumption in Postwar America
Kathy Peiss, Hope in a Jar: The Making of American Beauty Culture
Robert Weems, Desegregating the Dollar 
Alice Echols, Hot Stuff:  Disco and the Remaking of American Culture
Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club
Dwight McBride, Why I hate Abercrombie & Fitch

 

 Coures for M.A. students only (FALL 2016)

HIS 6939-025:  “Germany’s World Wars and Their Legacies”
CRN#  94055
Instructor: Dr. Rodgers
Tues. 6:00pm - 9:45pm  SOC 255
jlrodgers@usf.edu

In 2015, Time magazine named German Chancellor Angela Merkel as the person of the year for opening her country’s borders to hundreds of thousands of refugees and managing Europe’s debt crisis. Both decisions drew domestic and international praise and criticism. Yet, one common thread that ran through analyses was what one West German diplomat only 50 years earlier had referred to as the “regrettable aspects of recent German history.”

Scratching the surface of the parallels drawn between Germany’s role(s) in refugee crises and Greece’s demand for war reparations exposes those “regrettable aspects”: the long afterlives of the two world wars that Germany started in the 20th century. Each conflict dramatically reshaped the physical, demographic, and intellectual landscapes of not only Germany, but also Europe and the globe. This pro-seminar examines Germany’s experiences during World Wars I and II as well as their lasting social, political, cultural, and economic legacies that that continue to influence Germany’s position in the world.

 

HIS 6939-019: “Rome and the Rise of Islam”
CRN#  94120                                   
Instructor: Dr. Decker
Mon. 2:00pm - 5:45pm SOC 255
mjdecker@usf.edu

Rome and the Rise of Islam examines social, cultural, political and religious encounters in the Middle East from the sixth through eighth centuries. We will learn about religion in Arabia, study the primary sources that help us understand this crucial moment in world history, and ask how and why the initial Islamic conquests were so successful. Finally, we will examine Christian and Jewish reactions to the rise of Islam and the role of apocalyptic expectation in the creation of a new monotheist faith.

 

HIS 6939-916  “ Digital Humanities ”
CRN 90475
Instructor:  Dr. Thomas
Thurs. 6:00pm - 9:45pm  SOC 255
davidjthomas@usf.edu

Learn to do research digitally, employing technology to pose questions previously unthinkable. Construct data-driven arguments visually, build tools, and create spaces for discussion. This course is an introduction to the emerging field of Digital Humanities, where scholars and students of the social sciences and humanities meet the world of computing. Assuming no extensive prior knowledge of technology, we will learn how to use tools enhance your arguments, find new forms of sources and multiply your productivity.

Make a dynamic map of New York City, displaying the evolving ethnic composition of its neighborhoods over the last century. Scan a diary, convert it to computer-readable text and use the results to map the changing topics and word choices of a historical source over a period of decades. Use network analysis tools to make an interactive social map of the individuals involved in national labor disputes. These are just a few examples of the results possible entirely with free online tools and sources.

Beyond new techniques, students will first encounter some of the major scholarly issues of the field.  We will explore the limitations and dangers digital methods, asking: to what extent can data be objective?

 

HIS 6939-911 “Naval Power in Antiquity”
CRN 94273
Instructor: Dr. W. Murray
murray@usf.edu

This seminar examines naval power as an important feature of ancient Mediterranean states (with an emphasis on the eastern Mediterranean, although Rome will get her due).  A state that controlled a strong navy could project power beyond its own borders, suppress or carry out piracy, facilitate or hinder trade, and insure a degree of economic stability.  All this came at a cost, however.  In order for us to gain a balanced view of this complex subject, we will consider the many factors that define an effective navy: 1) naval technology (ship design and weaponry), 2) manpower (crews, effective recruitment and payment), 3) wealth (revenues, expenditures, reserves, etc.), 4) naval administration (structure, personnel, state-owned equipment, ship houses, shipyards and other installations), 5) leadership (the effective application of strategy and tactics), 6) social, religious and political influences.  Our evidence will come from a wide array of sources--from Bronze Age wall paintings, from Geometric pottery, from historical texts, from inscriptions, from engineering manuals, from strategic handbooks, from experimental archaeology, and from the recovery and analysis of authentic ship rams.  You will be asked to struggle with primary evidence from fields of study that may not be familiar to you.  Hang in there . . . the results will be satisfying and, I hope, intellectually stimulating.   

 

COURSES OFFERED IN PREVIOUS TERMS:

Seminars offered in Spring 2015

HTY HIS 6939-007  CRN 11993  “Global History of Communism and Post-Communism”
Instructor: Dr. Alexopoulos
Wed. 2:00-5:45pm  SOC 257
galexopo@usf.edu

This mixed undergraduate/graduate seminar will examine the experience and legacy of communist political systems.  We will explore different countries, cultures, and eras-- from the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, to North Korea, China, and Cuba.  The class begins with a brief survey of communism, and then focuses on one country or region per week.  We will read a variety of texts, including historical monographs, anthropological studies, memoir accounts, and literature.  Our books consider different aspects of the communist experience globally.  One class session will be devoted to a writer’s workshop to prepare students for their research papers.  Students will write research papers on a topic of their choosing, and present their work to the class.

Required Books as of 10/16/14  (List subject to change):

Leslie Holmes, Communism: A Very Short Introduction;Slavenka Drakulic, How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed; Vladimir Voinovich, The Life and Extraordinary Adventures of Private Ivan Chonkin; Alexei Yurchak, Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More: The Last Soviet Generation; Tina Rosenberg, The Haunted Land: Facing Europe’s Ghosts After Communism; Liang Heng, Son of the Revolution; Blaine Harden, Escape from Camp 14: One Man’s Remarkable Odyssey from North Korea to Freedom in the West; Lillian Guerra, Visions of Power in Cuba: Revolution, Redemption, and Resistance, 1959-1971

 

HTY HIS 6939-919  CRN 23054   “Thucydides”
Instructor: Dr. Wm. Murray
Mon. 6:00-9:45pm  SOC 254
Murray@usf.edu

From 478 to 404 B.C., the most important phenomenon in Greek interstate relations was the Athenian Empire and the war fought by Sparta and her allies to destroy it.  The existence of this empire affected the internal structure of Athens and of many other states, including ones outside the Hellenic world. Cultural and intellectual developments of the period were deeply influenced by its existence as were economic conditions, whose definitions we only partly comprehend. The study of the Athenian Empire and the war fought to destroy it is both difficult and satisfying because of the nature of our source record, which demands a total immersion in the text of Thucydides as well as an understanding of contemporary inscriptional sources and later, historical texts. Our period is compelling, but so too is our guide Thucydides. During the semester, we will examine the text of Thucydides closely in order to see the ways in which he skillfully uses his narrative to make us feel like participants in the events he describes. A compelling subject (the disintegration of settled life in the face of war) in the hands of a powerful intellect and skillful writer make this a fascinating seminar. We will also focus during the semester on developing the skills required to research and write a major research paper, to present and defend the views contained in that paper and to critique (in a constructive way) the works of others.  In so doing, the student will learn how to use the resources of the USF Library, how to access a book or article through ILIAD (the Interlibrary Loan service), how to use a proper reference style (we'll be following the Chicago Manual of Style in this class), and how to correctly cite ancient sources. In this way, anyone throughout the world can find the passage you are quoting, no matter how common or obscure it is. In sum, the course will teach you skills essential for the study of ancient history and use a still-influential war and masterful text in order to do it. 

 

HTY HIS 6939-918  CRN 23052   “U.S. CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION”
Instructor: Dr. Belohlavek
Mon. 6:00-9:45pm  SOC 257
belohlav@usf.edu
As perhaps the high water mark in United States history, the Civil War has fascinated and intrigued Americans—both North and South—for generations. More recently, the interest of scholars and the general public has broadened beyond the battlefield to exploring the importance of social, cultural, diplomatic, and political aspects of the conflict. This course, which covers the period from the settlement of the Mexican War (1848) through the end of Reconstruction (1877), will have an eye towards that inclusion. The seminar will discuss the causes/coming of the war (1848-1860), the war itself (1861-1865), and the post-war era (1865-1877). Students are expected to read a book per week for the first 10 weeks and write a 15-20 page research paper on a topic of their choice (approved by the instructor). Specific questions about the nature of the class and the readings should be directed to the professor.

 

HTY HIS 6939-917  CRN 23040 / 7939-917 CRN 23041
The US and the Global Cold War
Instructor: Dr. Irwin
Mon. 6:00-9:45pm  SOC 255
juliai@usf.edu
This readings course examines the history of the United States in the context of the Global Cold War, c. 1945-1990. We will analyze how international events influenced the course of U.S. domestic history during this period, considering such topics as McCarthyism, the civil rights movement, and the expansion of the U.S. military-industrial complex. We will also study how the U.S. government and U.S. citizens influenced the wider world—politically, economically, and culturally—during this period. We will examine such subjects as Cold War geopolitics, development and humanitarian assistance, Americanization and globalization, and U.S. responses to decolonization. The readings for this course are designed to prepare students for comprehensive exam fields not only in modern U.S. history, but also in other areas of the 20th century world. The major written assignment for the course, therefore, will be fairly flexible, and will be tailored to each student's specific research needs and interests.

 

HTY HIS 6939-906  CRN 11994 / 7939-906 CRN 21771
20th Century US Radicalism
Instructor: Dr. Ottanelli
Wed. 6:00-9:45pm  SOC 255
Ottanelli@usf.edu

 

HTY HIS 6939-905  CRN 23315 / 7939-905 CRN 23316
Popular Religion Medieval and Early Modern Europe
Instructor: Dr. Koenig
Wed. 6:00-9:45pm  SOC 254
annekoenig@usf.edu

 

Seminars offered in Fall 2014

HIS 6908-901 “M.A. Capstone”
Instructor: Dr. Fraser Ottanelli
Thursdays 6:00 - 9:45pm
Ottanelli@usf.edu

This course will act as the final participatory course work of graduate students before they proceed to the thesis writing stage. Non-Thesis Track M.A. students may also participate if they intend to compose a polished writing sample for Ph.D. program applications.  The seminar will be divided into four parts. In the first part, students will read secondary historical scholarship dealing with the practice of historical research. The second is a research and writing intensive part in which each students—working in close contact with their advisors--will write a draft chapter of their thesis. The third part of the course entails circulating the draft chapter among the other seminar participants who will then provide typed evaluations assessing the strength and effectiveness of the chapter’s argument, its use of evidence, and its engagement with broader historiographical literature. Finally, students having received written peer and faculty comments will revise the chapter by the end of the semester.

 

HIS 6939 / 7939 - 902 “Early America”
Instructor: Dr. Levy
Mondays 6:00pm-9:45pm
plevy@usf.edu

Early America has been one of the most vibrant and theoretically creative subfields of American history. From the founding of English colonies to the events leading up to the American Revolution and encompassing all twenty six British colonies, scholars of early America have dealt with a wide range of places and eras and covered topics including European-Indian relations; the rise of slavery; colonial economies, processes, and conflict; questions of race, class, and gender; religious belief and practice; as well as landscape, the environment, material culture, and the written culture. No single class can begin to touch on all of the rich work that decades of scholarship have produced. Therefore, this class will be an introduction to some of the issues and concerns that have driven the field as seen through a mix of classic literature, and a main emphasis on current work. Students will have a shared reading for each week of class (usually a single monograph but occasionally a set of articles), and over the semester each participant will produce a total of three written papers responding to readings. This class is designed to built students’ understanding of the field and its discussions. Therefore, the emphasis will be on reading and in-class discussion as opposed to extensive primary source research papers. Response papers and class discussion of readings will make up the sum of our work. This class is ideal for students preparing for a comprehensive exam field, or for students to flesh out their understandings of American history or the Early Modern Era more broadly. 

 

HIS 6939 / 7939 - 910  “US History: 1865-1920”
Instructor: Dr. Prince
Tuesdays 6:00 - 9:45pm
ksp@usf.edu

This seminar explores the history of the United States from the end of the Civil War to the end of World War I. Topics to be addressed include: emancipation and Reconstruction; wealth and poverty in the Gilded Age; federal Indian policy and plains warfare; European immigration and nativism; Chinese immigration and exclusion; the rise of American empire; popular culture and consumerism; gender and women's rights; Progressivism; and World War I. The course is recommended for students with a major or minor field in U.S. history since 1865, but it should also prove useful for students with other chronological and geographical interests.

 

HIS 6939 / 7939 - 904 “Material Matters” 
Instructor: Dr. Benadusi
Tuesdays 6:00-9:45 pm 
benadusi@usf.edu

This course explores the social and cultural processes through which things -- from earrings to pottery, buildings to food -- became meaningful to early modern Europeans (15th-18th centuries). We will address a number of different issues such as the ways in which people’s need for things was created and/or shaped and the cultural relations of exchange through gifts, symbols and inheritance. We will also explore how modes of production and consumption not only shed light on people’s self-expression and collective identity but also on inequality. Material matters will be investigated in light of the remarkable changes taking place in early modern Europe: commercial innovations, technological advances, religious reformations, geographic explorations, the formation of states and colonial expansions. By viewing the production and consumption of material matters as a social process that involved multiple practitioners this course will show how and why material matters in the making of knowledge. Although Europe remains the focal point of discussion attention will be paid to the broader world. 

 

HIS 6939 /  7939 - 903  “The Modern Mediterranean”                                     
Instructor: Dr. Fontaine
Wednesdays 6:00 - 9:45pm
dfontaine@usf.edu

This course will examine the fundamental role the Mediterranean region has played in the modern world from the late eighteenth century to the present. With the decline of the Atlantic slave trade and mercantile economies, Europeans shifted their focus back to acquiring wealth and influence in regions closer to home. Montesquieu’s Persian Letters and Napoleon Bonaparte’s disastrous invasion of Egypt in 1798 demonstrate to a small extent the development of a notion of Orientalism that would shape European perceptions of the Middle East and North Africa and henceforth justify European colonial expansion into these territories. Yet these territories were also central to the development of conceptions of modernity that have become fundamental to our understanding of modern European and global history, including ideas and practices of secularism, citizenship, identity and nationalism, and violence.

Each week readings and class discussion will focus on themes including (but not limited to) Enlightenment and Modernity; Religion and Secularism; Orientalism; Identity, Ethnicity, and Nationalism; Colonialism and Violence; Movement, Migration, and Globalization; Resources and Exploitation; and Revolutions. In addition to completing all assigned readings and actively participating in class discussion, students will be required to write short reviews/response papers to selected course readings and a final historiographical essay on a topic of their choosing related to the course.

 

HIS 6939 - 917 “Imperial Russia”
Instructor: Dr. Boterbloem
Mondays 6:00 - 9:45pm
cboterbl@usf.edu

"This seminar investigates the origins and development of the Russian empire from the second half of the fifteenth century until the last Romanov tsar's abdication in 1917. It implicitly studies the question of "Russia's place in the world." Was the Russian Empire, as the Russian historian V.O. Kliuchevskii wanted, just another version of a European Empire, or was it an "Oriental Despotism" (as argued by Karl Wittfogel)? Perhaps, as Marshall Poe and others have argued, it was an empire sui generis, in other words, unique, neither European nor Asian. It certainly was a state which managed to overcome formidable odds between 1450 and 1917, surviving daunting foreign foes and vast internal crises and developing an intriguing blend as its imperial identity (at least among the elite of its Slavic peoples). It survived in part by mobilizing most of its energy into its military arm, which was certainly not to the benefit of the common good (a concept only gaining popularity in eighteenth-century Europe in any event). Peter the Great (r. 1689-1725) thus became the first "Enlightened Despot," a first servant of the state before Frederick the Great of Prussia (r. 1740-86) made this concept renowned. Military might, not the welfare of the people remained the tsars' priority until the very end. Thus the majority of people was enserfed, and stayed in this unfree legal condition far longer than in the countries that bordered the Russian Empire to the West. Serfdom's conditions could be so severe that Peter Kolchin has made an intriguing comparison between US slavery and Russian bond labor. But in this poorly educated and poor country, which technologically fell once more behind Europe in the nineteenth century, a culture was nonetheless created of which the best products even today rank among humanity's greatest achievements."

 

HIS 6939 - 034 “Byzantium in the Age of the Crusades”
Instructor: Dr. Decker
Thursdays 2:00 - 5:45pm
mjdecker@usf.edu

Byzantium in the Age of the Crusades is a reading and research seminar that explores the history of the Byzantine Empire and its relations with its neighbors from the tenth through fifteenth centuries. The main focus of the course is on the social, cultural, and political history of the empire during the dynasty of the Comneni family beginning with the seizure of the throne by the usurper Isaac I Comnenus in 1057 through the end of the dynasty in 1185. This was an epoch of immense change and of great vitality in Byzantium and the Mediterranean. Through primary and secondary readings we will analyze and discuss the historiography of the period, social change, the nature of political authority, heresy, ideology, and the economic transition of Byzantium from a world power to a regional state. All of these topics will be read within the context of the first wave of European imperialism - the Crusading movement which began in 1095 and whose greatest expeditions, the First, Second, and Third Crusade coincided with the reign of the Comneni.

 

HIS 6939 - 916  “Sex and the City: Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Rome”
Instructor: Dr.  Langford
Tuesdays 6:00 - 9:45pm
langford@usf.edu

We will explore various ways in which Romans and their subjects constructed sexuality and gender.  Our investigations will mostly focus upon the Late Republic and Early to High Empire (1st C. BC – AD 2nd C.)  Students will quickly discover the differences between sex and gender and will grapple with the essentialist vs. constructionalist debate.  They will ascertain that gender is only one metaphorical language through which power relationships are articulated. Other languages include ethnicity, social class, and wealth which are often expressed in gendered terms and thus must be considered in our explorations, even if only tangentially. 

Students will read about 100-200 pages of primary documents in preparation for class discussions as well as about 200-300 pages of modern scholarship each week. Ancient history graduate students will be expected to read selected passages in Latin and to produce a final argumentative essay 25-30 pages long based on original research.

 

HIS 6939 – 919  “20th Century Revolutions”
Instructor: Dr. Novoa
Wednesdays 6:00 – 9:45pm
ainovoa@usf.edu

Graduate Seminars offered in Spring 2014

HIS 6939/7939 Atlantic Modernities 1750-1900
Dr. Connolly
Tuesday, 2:00-5:45
bconnolly@usf.edu

Twenty years ago, Paul Gilroy published his landmark work, The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciouness, in which he offered “a heartfelt plea against the closure of the categories with which we conduct our political lives…The history of the black Atlantic yields a course of lessons as to the instability and mutability of identified which are always unfinished, always being remade.”  In this course we will take up Gilroy’s challenge by placing the relative new spatial heuristic of the “Atlantic” in productive tension with the old temporal designation “modernity.”  Is there an Atlantic modernity?  Are there multiple modernities, multiple Atlantics?  WE will trace this problem across the uneven histories of the long nineteenth century, with attention paid to slavery, race, capitalism, and religion.

Potential Readings (Please do not purchase until the syllabus is finalized)
Paul Gilroy, The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness
Ian Baucom, Specters of the Atlantic: Finance Capital, Slavery, and the Philosophy
            of History
Andrew Zimmerman, Alabama in Africa: Booker T. Washington, the German Empire,
            and the Globalization of the New South
Joan Dayan, Haiti, History, and the Gods
Laurent Dubois, A Colony of Citizens: Revolution and Slave Emancipation in the
            French Caribbean, 1787-1804
James H. Sweet, Domingos Álvares, African Healing, and the Intellectual History of
            The Atlantic World
Saidiya Hartman, Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route

 

HIS 6939/7939 U.S. History Research Seminar
Dr. Johnson
Wednesday, 6:00-9:45
davidjohnson@usf.edu

This course is designed as an opportunity for you to take a prospectus, proposal, or historiographical paper already completed and expand it into a primary source research paper. By the end of the semester, each student will produce a 35-page original, publishable research paper based on primary sources that makes a contribution to relevant historiographical and methodological debates in the scholarly literature. We will meet to discuss a few common reading on writing, archival research, conducting oral histories ,etc., and also to present, share, and critique work.  But unlike in a typical reading seminar, the bulk of the semester will be spent on independent research. The course is open to any graduate student in U.S. history--working in any time period and on any topic/subfield--who has a prospectus, proposal or historiographical paper in hand ready to expand and a desire to do primary source research and hone their historical skills.

 

HIS 6939/7939 Immigration and Ethnicity
Dr. Fraser Ottanelli
Monday, 6:00-9:45
ottanelli@usf.edu

This graduate seminar explores the intricate connections linking the experiences of migration, work, international class solidarity, multi-ethnic labor organizations, and the development of national and ethnic identities. We begin with an overview of some of the recent work in, and a variety of approaches to, the field. Then, focusing on the years from the onset of mass migration at the end of the 19th century to the present, the seminar will examine 1) the forces that led to the decision to migrate; 2) the factors that determined who left, who stayed and who returned; 3) the elements that determined where migrants settled and why; and finally, we will investigate the different ways in which migrant workers reconciled their enduring ties with their countries of origin, negotiated their relationship with the labor movement of their country of adoption, and defined their place within their ethnic communities. By rethinking national and transnational approaches not as separate categories but as entwined levels of analysis, the seminar will “internationalize” the study of the history of migration and of the development of class and ethnic identity.

 

HIS 6939/7939: Problems in Public History
Dr. Philip Levy
Tuesday, 6:00-9:45
plevy@usf.edu

Public History is a meeting place of many subfields, methods, and approaches all linked by sets of theoretical concerns and questions of audience and ownership over historical knowledge. Public History is also a rapidly growing subfield in the forefront of responding to challenges from within and outside academe. Its umbrella covers areas as diverse as memory, "uses." museum studies, commemoration, and looks to create output in both the traditional academic format and other more publicly accessible media. This class is a broad survey of current literature in the field with special attention paid to questions and conflicts over the ownership of the historical past. 

  

HIS 6939/7939: Research Seminar: European History
Dr. Giovanna Benadusi
Monday, 6:00-9:45
benadusi@usf.edu

This research seminar will help students make a realistic transition to research. Its goal is not to provide additional substantive material or methodological tools but to help students apply their cumulative understanding, theoretical knowledge, and research skills to a practical test. Ph.D. students will be expected to carry out a guided but independent project that will result into a primary-source based research paper or chapter of a thesis/dissertation. Students in the MA program will be able to go through the formative stages of proposal development and transform latent ideas into a well-structured researchable project. Most of the time will be spent discussing and peer-reviewing drafts of students’ writing. As part of the seminar we will also have a number of speakers coming in to present their research. Students will practice research skills by reading these speakers’ short papers beforehand and producing a signed, two double-spaced page review. At the end of the semester there will be formal presentations of the final product. Presentations are open to all graduate students and faculty. Close contacts with mentors are expected. Students are also strongly encouraged to attend (and read the papers for) the four presentations at “Works in Progress Seminar” organized by the History department, which is held on a Friday between 12:30 and 2:00. Detailed information will be distributed at the beginning of the semester.

 

HIS 6939/7939: European History: Medicine, Society, and the Body in Medieval and Early Modern Europe
Anne Koenig
Tuesday, 6:00-9:45pm
annekoenig@usf.edu

This graduate course is intended to be an introduction to the theories, practices, and meanings of medicine and the body in pre-modern Europe. The goal of this class is to provide students with a working understanding of the fields of medicine in Medieval and Early Modern Europe, as well as to give students a familiarity with some of the historiographic trends in the study of pre-modern medicine. This class will introduce students to intellectual traditions of medicine and to the relation of medicine to other intellectual traditions (e.g. natural philosophy, magic, alchemy). It will also explore cultural histories of medicine, paying particular attention to the relationships of medicine to religion, gender, and sexuality.

In addition to primary source readings and articles, likely texts include:
Luke Demaitre, Medieval Medicine
Monica Green, Making Women’s Medicine Masculine: the Rise of Male Authority in Pre-Modern Gynaecology
Marie-Christine Pouchelle, The Body and Surgery in the Middle Ages
Katharine Park, The Secrets of Women
Mary Lindemann, Medicine and Society in Early Modern Europe
Carlo M. Cipolla, Faith, Reason and the Plague in Seventeenth-Century Tuscany
Michael MacDonald, Mystical Bedlam: Madness, Anxiety and Healing in Seventeenth-Century England
Holly Tucker, Blood Work: A Tale of Medicine and Murder in the Scientific Revolution
Thomas Laqueur, Making Sex: Body and Gender from the Greeks to Freud

 

HIS 6939/7939: The U.S. & the Modern World
Dr. Julia Irwin
Wednesday, 2:00-5:45pm
Juliai@usf.edu

This readings course examines the history of the United States and its relations with the world from the turn of the 20th century to the present. We will analyze the ways that the U.S. government and U.S. citizens have influenced the wider world, politically, economically, and culturally. At the same time, we will consider how people and events outside the United States have influenced American domestic history. Topics include internationalism and isolationism; military interventions, economic expansion, and the spread of American cultural, religious, and social ideas; the role of state vs. non-state actors; and the ideology, rhetoric, and reality of “American exceptionalism.” The written assignment for the course will be fairly flexible, and will be tailored to each student's specific research needs and interests.

 

HIS 6939: Modernization & Latin America
Dr. Scott Ickes
Thurs., 2:00-5:45
sickes@usf.edu

This is a reading, research and writing seminar that covers the historical period roughly from 1880-1970 during which most major Latin American nations experienced significant pressures and changes associated with modernization. These pressure and changes, however, played out somewhat differently to analogous changes across the north Atlantic. I have chosen readings and topics which focus on change, continuity, and hybridity during this period as we explore the extraordinary vitality of this promising yet often troubled region, a region that has been and will to continue to be closely integrated with the United States. The readings focus on the experiences of particular social groups – e.g., urban African-Brazilians, industrial and rural workers, middle-class women, etc., reminding us that history is about both processes and people.

 

HIS 6939: Age of Jefferson
Dr. John M. Belohlavek
Tues., 6:00-9:45
belohlav@usf.edu

The “Age of Jefferson” seminar explores and investigates the formation of the new American republic from 1783-1828.  Topics to be considered will include the philosophical and political struggle to determine whether that republic should vest its powers in the states or a national government (i.e., the Articles of Confederation vs. the Constitution).   Both threatening and stimulating the ensuing first party system and its alliances were elements of internal discord (Shays’ Rebellion and the Whiskey Rebellion) and concurrently threats from the major European powers.  We will examine how international war as well as conflicts and treaties with France, Spain, and Britain helped reshape the nation. 

This era also witnessed dramatic social and economic changes that include the rise of utopian communities, women in politics, the removal of the American Indian, slave insurrection, and the transportation revolution among others.  The course concludes with a look at the rise of Andrew Jackson, majoritarian democracy, and the second party system in the 1820s.  Among the ten books to be assigned will be volumes on the aforementioned topics: politics, foreign affairs, women, Indians, slavery, and culture.

Please see, for example, Thomas Slaughter, THE WHISKEY REBELLION, Joseph Ellis:  AMERICAN SPHINX: THE CHARACTER OF THOMAS JEFFERSON,  Douglas Egerton, HE SHALL GO OUT FREE:  THE LIVES OF DENMARK VESEY, and Catherine Allgor, PARLOR POLITICS, as representative literature what will be assigned.

 

HIS 6939: Genocide & Human Rights
Dr. Golfo Alexopoulos
Thurs., 2:200-5:45
galexopo@usf.edu

The seminar on “Genocide and Human Rights” will consider a variety of interrelated issues.  First, we will examine the origins of our notion of human rights and how this idea has evolved since the Enlightenment.  Second, we look at individual acts of genocide and the emergence of the genocide concept in the postwar period.  Our readings will include books and articles, and the discussion will incorporate cases from Europe, Africa and Asia in the twentieth century.  Finally, we end with the pursuit of justice and normalcy in the aftermath of genocide.  We will explore the difficult ways that history, law and memory have interacted in international criminal tribunals, and how societies have reconciled or made sense of the complex motives behind “crimes against humanity.”  Students will write a research paper on a topic of their choice. 
ASSIGNED READINGS:
BOOKS:
*          Lynn Hunt, Inventing Human Rights: A History.        
*          Samuel Moyn, The Last Utopia: Human Rights in History.
*          Samantha Power, A Problem from Hell: America and the Age of Genocide.
*          Eric D. Weitz, A Century of Genocide: Utopias of Race and Nation.
*          Hannah Arendt, Eichmann in Jerusalem.
*          Richard Wilson, Writing History in International Criminal Trials.
*          Martha Minow, Between Vengeance and Forgiveness: Facing History after Genocide and Mass Violence.
ARTICLES:
*          Mark Mazower, “The G-Word,” London Review of Books (February 8, 2001).
*          Ronald Grigor Suny, “Introduction,” in A Question of Genocide: Armenians and Turks at the End of the Ottoman Empire.
*          Edward Kissi, “Genocide in Cambodia and Ethiopia,” in Robert Gellately and Ben Kiernan, eds., The Specter of Genocide: Mass Murder in Historical Perspective.

 

HIS 6939: Ancient Naval Power in Antiquity
Dr. William Murray
Wednesday, 6:00-9:45
murray@usf.edu

The course examines naval power as an important feature of ancient Mediterranean states (with an emphasis on the eastern Mediterranean).  A state that controlled a strong navy could project power beyond its own borders, suppress or carry out piracy, facilitate or hinder trade, and insure a degree of economic stability.  All this came at a cost of building and maintaining a top notch navy.  To understand this complex subject, we will consider the many factors that define an effective navy: 1) naval technology (ship design and weaponry), 2) manpower (crews, effective recruitment and payment), 3) wealth (revenues, expenditures, reserves, etc.), 4) naval administration (structure, personnel, state-owned equipment, ship houses, shipyards and other installations), 5) leadership (the effective application of strategy and tactics), 6) social, religious and political influences.  Our evidence will come from a wide array of sources--from Bronze Age wall paintings, from Geometric pottery, from historical texts, from inscriptions, from engineering manuals, from strategic handbooks, and from experimental archaeology.  You will be asked to struggle with primary evidence from fields of study that may not be familiar to you.  Hang in there . . . the results will be satisfying and, I hope, intellectually stimulating.

 

HIS 6939: Holocaust: History and Memory
Dr. Tamara Zwick
Friday, 6:00-9:45
tzwick@usf.edu

Following World War II, a new word was invented and added to the German vocabulary: Vergangenheitsbewältigung, or “coming to terms with the past.”  This course will examine a range of interdisciplinary works by historians, literary theorists, journalists, documentary and feature film-makers, and cartoonists, all of whom have attempted to respond to the problem of coming to terms with a past that includes genocide. Topics include testimonies of perpetrators, survivors and the children of survivors; physical sites of memory, including memorials, museums, and "memory tourism;" and visual treatment of the Holocaust in film.

Tentative reading list:

Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz (1958)
Hannah Arendt, Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil (1963)
Art Spiegelman, Maus: A Survivor’s Tale/Maus: A Survivor’s Tale, II: And Here My Troubles Began (1986/1991)
James Young, The Texture of Memory: Holocaust Memorials and Meaning (1993)
Saul Friedländer, When Memory Comes (1979)
Pierre Vidal-Naquet, Assassins of Memory: Essays on the Denial of the Holocaust (1992) Elazar Barkan,The Guilt of Nations:Restitution and Negotiating Historical Injustices(2000)
Selected articles by Christopher Browning, Geoffrey H. Hartman, James Young, Caroline Wiedmer, Timothy Ryback, Tim Cole, Donald Horne, Jonathan Rosen, Michael Shermer and Alex Grobman, Illan Avisar, Omer Bar Tov, Alvin H. Rosenfeld, and others.

Graduate Semianrs offered in Fall 2013

HIS 6939/7939-004 “U.S. Urban Spaces & Cultures”
Instructor: Dr. Barbara Berglund
Wednesdays  2:00-5:45
bberglund@usf.edu

This seminar on U.S. Urban Spaces and Cultures provides an introduction to the field of urban cultural history through a combination of intensive readings in secondary literature and primary-source-based research assignments for a West Tampa public history project. The assigned books and articles explore some of the varied methodological, theoretical, and topical approaches historians have used to interpret the meanings of urban cultural forms, spaces, and practices in U.S. society.  Readings traverse national regions and span from the nineteenth through the twentieth century.  West Tampa, a multicultural urban neighborhood, has been shaped by waves of immigrants since its founding as an independent city in 1892 (it was annexed by the city of Tampa in 1925). In the West Tampa public history project, you will explore and document this complex, yet understudied history through specific research assignments designed to use the same skills you typically use when writing a primary-source-based paper (i.e., good writing, careful research methods, cogent argumentation, engaging narrative development) but in a novel arena and for a different audience.  This should allow you to both sharpen your existing skills and build some new ones.  History graduate students only.
Contributes to fields in: Public History, America to 1877, U.S. since 1877

 

HIS 6939/7939-005 “The Atlantic World: Europe & The Americas 1492-1850”
Instructor: Dr. Frances Ramos
Tuesdays 2:00-5:45
framos@usf.edu

This course explores the field of “Atlantic history,” a term that has become code for scholarship focusing on either the African Diaspora or the impact of commercial networks on the eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century American revolutions.   Nevertheless, in the early modern period, people and ideas moved freely from ports within Europe, Africa, and the Americas.  People on both sides of the Atlantic shared similar beliefs, assumptions, and conventions, and the residents of seventeenth-century Lima had arguably more in common with the residents of Seville, Spain than with the people of the Andean interior.
Recently, intellectual historians have begun to carve out a place in the field with studies focusing on the diffusion and appropriation of ideas across the Atlantic and new studies continue to reshape the contours of the field of Atlantic history.  Students will familiarize themselves with this growing body of scholarship and in the end, produce a final project tailored to meet their own particular research interests. 

Contributes to fields in: Early Modern Worlds, America to 1877, Latin America

HIS 6939/7939-903 “Myth & Memory in U.S. History”
Instructor: Dr. Steven Prince
Wednesdays 6:20-9:55
ksp@usf.edu
“The past is not dead,” wrote William Faulkner. “It’s not even past.” As Faulkner recognized, historians are not the only people to lay claim to the past. Throughout U.S. history, Americans of all stripes have turned to history (or to their impression of it) in an attempt to shape the present and the future. Memory studies – one of the most significant historiographical developments of the past two decades – offers an important new avenue for historical inquiry. This seminar on “Myth and Memory in U.S. History” will explore many of the most important works in this field, while attempting to grapple with the meaning, significance, and limitations of memory studies. For Americans, the past has never been dead. It has always been a site of power, contestation, and debate. Topics to be addressed include: the memory of the American Revolution and the founding fathers, slavery and remembrance, the Civil War and the Lost Cause, World War II and the “greatest generation,” the Civil Rights movement, and more recent events including 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina. Selected comparative readings will tie course themes to larger global trends. In addition to assigned course readings, students will complete a “dehydrated research paper” on a memory-themed topic of their choosing. This seminar should be of special interest to students of public history and to those planning exam fields in U.S. history (both pre- and post-1877).
Contributes to fields in: U.S. since 1877, Public History

HIS 6939/7939-909 “U.S. Since 1945”
Instructor: Dr. David Johnson
Tuesdays 6:20-9:55
davidjohnson@usf.edu
This seminar will cover major historiographical work on political, cultural and social life in the United States since 1945.  It will examine the different ways that historians have tried to make sense of this period, using various analytical tools—such as race, gender, class, and sexuality—and various themes—such as militarization, rights consciousness, and consumerism.  Bracketing the cold war (covered in another seminar I offer), one of the major questions that emerges is what accounts for the rise of conservatism in the late twentieth century U.S.? As a readings course, it should prepare graduate students with a field in modern US history for their comprehensive exams.

Contributes to fields in: U.S. since 1877

Tentative Reading List:

  1. Michael Sherry, In the Shadow of War (Yale)           
  2. Thomas Sugrue, Origins of the Urban Crisis:  Race and Inequality in Post-war Detroit (Princeton)                                                
  3. Kevin Kruse, White Flight:  Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism (Princeton)
  4. Lizabeth Cohen, A Consumer’s Republic:  The Politics of Mass Consumption in Postwar America (Random House)                                    
  5. Robert Dean, Imperial Brotherhood:  Gender and the Making of Cold War Foreign Policy (Massachusetts)                                                
  6. Christian Appy, Working-Class War (North Carolina)
  7. Rebecca Klatch, A Generation Divided:  The New Left, the New Right, and the 1960s (California)                                                
  8. Sara Evans, Personal Politics:  The Roots of Women’s Liberation (Random House)
  9. Lisa McGrir, Suburban Warriors:  The Origins of the New American Right (Princeton)
  10. Jefferson Cowie, Stayin’ Alive:  The 1970s and the Last Days of the Working Class  (The New Press)                                            
  11. Nancy Maclean, Freedom is Not Enough:  The Opening of the American Workplace (Harvard)                                        
  12. Bethany Moreton, To Serve God and Wal-Mart:  The Making of Christian Free Enterprise (Harvard)

           

HIS 6939/7939-910 “Readings in Italian History”
Instructor: Dr. Giovanna Benadusi
Tuesdays 6:20-9:55
benadusi@usf.edu
Until recently, scholars regarded the history of early modern Italy (the centuries between the Renaissance and the age of revolutions) as one of fragmentation, isolation and decline, exemplified by the absence of a unified Italian state, foreign domination, and economic and cultural stagnation.  This interpretation has continued to influence US scholarship up to the 1980s as evidenced by a dearth of research on this period, especially when compared to the rich and vibrant historiography of the Italian Renaissance (1200-1500).  Viewing Italy as both larger and more connected internally and to the rest of the world, this reading seminar 1) will cover some of the most recent and stimulating works by both Anglophone and Italian scholars (when available in translation) on the political, cultural and social history of the peninsula during these “forgotten centuries.”  2) It will also evaluate the theoretical models with which historians operate, paying particular attention to analytical tools such as gender, class, ethnicity, and sexuality.  3) Finally it will offer an opportunity to develop skills in historical analysis and writing to prepare students for the comprehensive exams, regardless of their fields of interest.  Some of the topics covered include: processes of state building, the emergence of consumer-oriented urban society and economy, the spread of empirical and experimental practices and the advances of a new scientific culture, ethnic and religious trading diasporas, expansion and colonial imperialism, post-Tridentine reforms and missionary work, travel and the Grand Tour.
Students will not write a final research paper but a number of book reviews on the readings assigned throughout the semester.
Here are some potential titles but DO NOT BUY THE BOOKS YET!!!
Contributes to fields in: Early Modern Worlds

  1. Appuhn, Karl. The Forest on the Sea. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009.
  2. Biagioli, Mario. Galileo, Courtier: The Practice of Science in the Culture of Absolutism. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1993.
  3. Castiglione, Caroline. Patrons and Adversaries: Nobles and Villagers in Italian Politics, 1640-1760. Oxford University Press, 2005.
  4. Cavallo, Sandra. Artisans of the Body in Early Modern Italy: Identities, Families and Masculinities. Manchester University Press, 2010.
  5. Findlen, Paula. Possessing Nature: Museums, Collecting and Scientific Culture in Early Modern Italy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994. Paperback edition, 1996
  6. Gentilcore, David. Healers and Healing in Early Modern Italy. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1998.
  7. Muir, Edward. Mad blood stirring: Vendetta and factions in Friuli during the Renaissance. Baltimore. Md: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993.
  8. Trivellato, Francesca. The Familiarity of Strangers. The Sephardic Diaspora, Livorno, and Cross-Cultural Trade in the Early Modern Period. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009.

 

HIS 6939-902 “Public History”
Instructor: Dr. Philip Levy
Mondays 6:20-9:55
plevy@usf.edu

Ok, I admit it, Public History is not the sexiest term.  But nevertheless, it is one of the most exciting and dynamic growing subfields in the current world of professional history. Why is that? It is partly due to the Internet, partly due to the power of popular culture, partly due to the fact that history majors end up using their skills in such a wide range of careers. When we say public history we mean everything from movies to Wikipedia, from museums to Gasparilla Day, from fights over school textbook standards to fights over preserving historical sites. All of that and more is what we mean when we invoke Public History. Think of it as History in the Trenches—the places, debates, and causes where history takes meaning in contemporary life and shapes how, who, and why we are who we are. These concerns can land anywhere and involve any historical field, but in this class we will look at American Public History—particularly with an eye towards case studies drawn from the more distant past. Our topics will include the issues surrounding the Revolution, Salem witch trials, pirates, and museums like Colonial Williamsburg to name just a few.  In all cases though, we will look at the past not just to understand its debates, but also to understand how it has continued to make meaning.
Contributes to fields in: Public History, America to 1877

 

HIS 6939-916 “20th Century Revolutions”
Instructor: Dr. Adriana Novoa
Mondays 6:20-9:55
ainovoa@usf.edu
       Latin America suffered a drastic transformation in the 20th century with the emergence of a new revolutionary culture that proposed radical economic, social and cultural change. We will analyze the characteristics of the different revolutionary movements, and the reasons that explain the success of some and the failure of others, beginning with the Mexican Revolution of 1910.  We will analyze the Mexican, Cuban and Nicaraguan revolutions together with those that failed in El Salvador and Peru in an effort to understand the evolution of the revolutionary movements over the 20th century. We will also pay attention to the historiography and debates surrounding different interpretations of these movements, and the culture that they inspired.
Contributes to fields in: Latin America

Graduate Level Seminars offered in Spring 2013

HIS 6939- 004 “Urban Public History”
Instructor: Dr. Barbara Berglund
Thursdays 2:00-5:45
bberglund@usf.edu
This course in Urban Public History has three distinct but overlapping and interrelated phases that combine reading in secondary literature, historical research, and experiential learning.  In the first phase of the course, we will read some key works in the fields of urban history and urban public history.  In the second phase, course participants will be divided into four work groups – each work group will be assigned to develop the content and script for one of four Downtown History Walks (Shopping Downtown, Martial Memorials, Early Tampa, and Illicit Tampa) planned in conjunction with the Tampa Downtown Partnership’s Do the Local Motion Program.  Since a skeleton outline of each route along with designated key sites will be provided, this will involve research in secondary sources in urban history and Tampa history as well as some primary source research in local archives in addition to numerous (often independent of class time) visits to the downtown area and walk route.  The third phase will involve leading the four walks on pre-scheduled Fridays during the month of April.  Typically the Do The Local Motion Program draws 60-80 people to each of their walks.  In addition to leading the walks, at the end of the semester, students will produce individual written and oral reports on the process of researching, creating, and delivering the walks and provide materials (scripts, routes, and historical background) to the Do the Local Motion Program in a pre-designated format.  Students must be available for Thursday afternoon class meetings, Friday walks in April as well as attending one or more additional Friday walks during the semester to get a sense of what to expect for your own walk, and travel to downtown and local archives.  History department graduate students only.

 

HIS 6939- 005 “Modern Latin America”
Instructor: Dr. Scott Ickes
Wednesdays 2:00-5:45
sickes@usf.edu
This seminar addresses the process of modernization in early to mid-twentieth-century Latin America, with the emphasis on Brazil. Readings will focus on how modernity was understood, how elites set about trying to modernize, and the responses and consequences for the region’s peoples. A major component of the course will be a 20-25 page research paper on an aspect of modernization in Latin America.

 

HIS 6939- 901 “American Civil War and Reconstruction”
Instructor: Dr. John Belohlavek
Mondays 6:20-9:55
belohlav@usf.edu
This course deals with the turbulent decades between the Mexican-American War (1846) and the end of Reconstruction (1877).   For the first several months of the term, the seminar emphasizes weekly monographic readings (there will be some choice of books) and discussion on a variety of topics in the period—including Caribbean expansion, Bleeding Kansas, and North-South cultural differences in an effort to understand the coming of the conflict.    The war years will get due attention on subjects both military and non-military in nature.  We will also explore Reconstruction and the role of American memory.   The seminar then shifts gears to the crafting of a research paper on a subject of the student’s choice that will be presented the last two weeks of class.   Coordinated with the research paper, the students will also be asked to write a critical review of a peer’s research effort.     

 

HIS  6939- 903 “Gender & Sexuality in Modern U.S. History”
Instructor: Dr. David Johnson
Wednesdays 6:20-9:55
davidjohnson@usf.edu
This course offers an in-depth examination of recent historiography in the subfield of the history of sexuality.  We will consider how popular, legal and other discourses concerning sex and sexuality have transformed throughout 20th century U.S. history. We will examine how notions of sex, gender and the family are not unchanging, natural essences but how they have developed historically; how they vary by race and class; how they have been affected by historical transformations such as urbanization and industrialization; and how they have become arenas of cultural and political contestation.
Starting with some theoretical work from Michel Foucault and his postmodern friends, we will consider the common assumption that the change in American sexual standards is best understood as one of increasing liberalization and explore what alternative explanatory frameworks historians have proposed.  How have categories, identities, and norms concerning sex changed over time? How did issues of gender and sexuality (abortion, gay marriage, sex education, feminism) come to figure so centrally in modern American political culture?

Tentative Reading List: Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality: Volume I:  An Introduction (Random House, 1978), George Chauncey, Gay New York: Gender, Urban Culture, and the Making of the Gay Male World, 1890-1940 (Basic Books, 1994), Leslie Reagan, When Abortion was a Crime:  Women, Medicine and the Law in the U.S. 1867-1973 (California, 1997), Joanne Meyerowitz, How Sex Changed:  A History of Transsexuality in the U.S. (Harvard, 2002), Elizabeth Fraterrigo, Playboy and the Making of the Good Life in Modern America (Oxford, 2009), Nan Alamilla Boyd, Wide Open Town: A History of Queer San Francisco to 1965 (California, 2003), Whitney Strub, Perversion for Profit: The Politics of Pornography and the Rise of the New Right (Columbia, 2011), Beth Bailey, Sex in the Heartland (Harvard, 1999), Christian Luker, When Sex Goes to School:  Warring Views on Sex and Sex Education Since the Sixties (Norton, 2007), Donald Critchlow, Phyllis Schlafly and Grassroots Conservatism

 

HIS 6939- 904 “Medicine, Science, and Empire”
Instructor: Dr. Julia Irwin
Tuesdays 6:20-9:55
juliai@usf.edu
This seminar examines the history and historiography of empire through the lenses of science, medicine, and technology. Our scope of inquiry will be quite broad—we will consider both European and American imperial ventures in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, from the 18th century to the near present. Unifying these geographically and temporally diverse readings, however, will be their shared attention to the function of science in colonial and neo-colonial enterprises. In our weekly discussions, we will explore a number of related themes. These include (but are by no means limited to): the ideologies of civilization and modernization; shifting discourses on race, gender, and reproduction; the power accorded to Western scientific and medical expertise and its relation to local, indigenous forms of knowledge; the pursuit of both social and environmental engineering; and the usefulness of Michel Foucault’s concept of “biopower.” By comparing and contrasting these themes across time and space, we will develop a deeper understanding of the workings of empire in the modern world.

 

HIS 6939- 905 “Race in U.S. History”
Instructor: Dr. Steven Prince
Wednesdays 6:20-9:55
ksp@usf.edu
This course explores the shifting landscape of race and racism in U.S. history from the late 18th century to the present. Though historians now argue that race is better understood as a social construction than a biological fact, racial thinking has had serious implications for the course of United States history. Topics to be discussed include: the meaning of race in early America; slavery and racial formation; African-American history from slavery to freedom; the construction of "whiteness"; European, Asian, and Latin American immigration; race and U.S. empire in the 19th and 20th centuries; eugenics and racial science; the place of ethnicity; the meaning of race in today's "color-blind" society.

 

HIS 6939- 906 “Colonial U.S.”
Instructor: Dr. Philip Levy
Tuesdays 6:20-9:55
plevy@usf.edu
This course is large view survey of 40 years of early American historiography. It designed with the comps destined graduate student in mind and does not presuppose any substantive in-field background. Early America has been one of the most vibrant and theoretically creative subfields of American history. This reading-intensive seminar will explore how that creativity took shape as we read selected highlights to make sense of a wide range of places, peoples and concerns. The class will rest on core shared readings (monographs primarily) but will allow for more focused individually selected and needs based readings as the semester progresses. Writing will be historiographic and thematic and not based on primary research. 

 

HIS 6939-907 “Herodotus”
Instructor: Dr. William Murray
Tuesdays 6:20-9:55
murray@usf.edu
Herodotus: master story-teller, tireless traveler, the first historian and ethnographer, a genius whose true worth is frequently underrated. This seminar examines the history of the period c. 650-478 B.C., through the text of Herodotus' HISTORIES. We will learn about the unruly, independent Greek states of the 7th and 6th centuries and the rise of a new power, Persia, which was redrawing the boundaries of the ancient Near East. We will use the text of Herodotus to gauge one Greek's "world view" during the mid-5th century, and judge from this what "most Greeks" knew about other cultures, what they considered to be normal and abnormal behavior, how they felt they fit in with the rest of the world. In a sense, we will be exploring the origins of the concept of "Globalization" among the ancient Greeks. We will also learn something about Herodotus as an historian: his sources of information, his conception of time, his religious views, grasp of geography, his methods of gathering and processing information, and his supposed gullibility. Our study will culminate in the story of the Greek struggle to preserve their freedom from Persia's power. Herodotus grew to appreciate the central nature of this event, and utilized it as the focal point for western literature's first true history. Part epic, part "tall tale", part social commentary, part "history" (in the modern sense), his work remains our basic source for these important events. We will read it with care from cover to cover.

 

HIS 6939-911 “Early Modern Mediterranean World”
Instructor: Dr. Giovanna Benadusi
Wednesdays 6:20-9:55
benadusi@usf.edu
Since antiquity, the Mediterranean Sea served as a springboard for numerous civilizations and was the common ground for the development of numerous creeds as well as the shared space for the growing contacts—sometime peaceful sometime not--of numerous peoples and cultures. It was in the later part of the fifteenth century that European intellectuals began to imagine themselves at the center of the world and to impose themselves as culturally superior to others, first to those in the East (a position recently defined as “orientalism”) and then to the new populations in the new world. Indeed the separation between West and East, North and South, first developed around the concept of religious diversity between Christians and Muslims, Greek Orthodox and Roman Catholics. However, the persistent view of Christianity and Islam as two cultures in conflict and of the region that contains them as permanently divided contrasts with the intrinsic cross-cultural nature of the Mediterranean World during the Renaissance/early modern period. Although Europe remains the focal point of discussion, the goal of this seminar is to highlight the rich and complex histories that together shaped European social interactions, cultural traditions, and political and economic systems, and to understand how historians have studied them. In particular we will try to understand how both those who lived within and those who looked at Europe from the outside constructed Europe’s shape and identities between the fifteenth and eighteenth centuries.

Some of the topics we will address: The Unity of the Sea: A “Total” Perspective, Violence and Clashes, Commercial Empires, Mediterranean Cities, Urban Identities, The Faces of Honor, Migrations, Ethnicity and Minority Groups, Travelers Tales, Material Culture

Some of the works we will read: Fernand Braudel, The Mediterranean and the Mediterranean World in the Age of Philip II, vol I, Part One, (1973)., Cemal Kafadar, “A Death in Venice (1575): Anatolian Muslim Merchants Trading in the Serenissima.”, James Amelang, “The Myth of the Mediterranean City.”, Federica Ambrosini, “Between Heresy and Free Thought, between the Mediterranean and the North: Heterodox Women in Seventeenth-Century Venice.”, Leslie Pierce, “Beyond the Harem Walls; Ottoman Royal Women and the Exercise of Power.”, Elizabeth A. Lehfeldt, “Ruling Sexuality: The Political Legitimacy of Isabel of Castile,”, Lucette Valensi, The Making of a Political Paradigm: The Ottoman State and Oriental Despotism.”



Graduate Level Seminars offered in Fall 2012

 HIS 6939- 004“The Soviet Union During WWII”
Instructor: Dr. Case Boterbloem
Mondays 2:00-5:45
cboterbl@usf.edu

This seminar will investigate the experience of the Soviet people (military and civilian) in the course of the Great Patriotic War (Second World War). It may look at such issues as the Soviet occupation of Eastern Poland in 1939, the Winter War with Finland, the occupation of the Baltic countries and the German attack on the Soviet Union of June 1941. It may study the brutality of the Nazi-Soviet front and the Holocaust in Nazi-occupied Soviet territory. It may study the Siege of Leningrad and the Battles of Kursk and Stalingrad. It may study the Ukrainian nationalist insurgency in Western Ukraine and the level of collaboration in Ukraine, the Baltic countries and elsewhere with the Nazis. It may investigate the partisan movement. It may study the fate of the "Punished Peoples." It will study the role of women in the war. It will also endeavor to explain the causes of the eventual Soviet victory and Stalin's relationship with the Western Allies. It may look at the postwar remembrance of the Great Patriotic War.

 

HIS 6939-901 “Material Matters”
Instructor: Dr. Giovanna Benadusi
Wednesdays 6:20-9:55
benadusi@usf.edu

This course explores the social and cultural processes through which things -- from earrings to pottery, buildings to food -- became meaningful to early modern Europeans (15th-18th centuries). We will address a number of different issues such as the ways in which people’s need for things was created and/or shaped and the cultural relations of exchange through gifts, symbols and inheritance. We will also explore how modes of production and consumption not only shed light on people’s self-expression and collective identity but also on inequality. Material matters will be investigated in light of the remarkable changes taking place in early modern Europe: commercial innovations, technological advances, religious reformations, geographic explorations, the formation of states and colonial expansions. By viewing the production and consumption of material matters as a social process that involved multiple practitioners this course will show how and why material matters in the making of knowledge. Although Europe remains the focal point of discussion attention will be paid to the broader world.

Selected readings (do not buy these books before consulting with me)
Richard Goldthwaite, Wealth and the demand for art in Renaissance Italy (1995)
John E. Wills, Jr. "European consumption and Asian production in the seventeenth and
Eighteenth centuries," in Consumption and the World of Goods ed. John Brewer and Roy Porter (London: Routledge, 1993), pp. 133-147.
Robert Finlay, “The Pilgrim Art: The Culture of Porcelain in World History,” Journal of World History, 9 (1998): 141-187.
David Kuchta, “The Making of the Self-Made Man: Class, Clothing, and English Masculinity, 1688-1832,” (1996)
U. Rublack, Dressing Up (Oxford 2010)

 

HIS 6939-902 “Science and Medicine in Latin America”
Instructor: Dr. Adriana Novoa
ainovoa@usf.edu

This class will analyze the historical processes that explain the development of scientific and medical inquiry in Latin America. We will contextualize the role that science and medicine played in the process of nation-formation, and how science and medicine defined notions of modernity, race, and gender.

 

HIS 6939-903 “American Cold War Culture”
Instructor: Dr. David Johnson
Wednesdays 6:20-9:55
davidjohnson@usf.edu

The cold war, the dominant paradigm in U.S. foreign relations for the late twentieth century, also profoundly affected American domestic culture—everything from civil rights legislation, to childhood education, to private family relations. It helped define the “normal” and the “patriotic” from the “deviant” and “treasonous.” Using a cultural history approach focusing on issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality, this class will examine the ways in which historians have studied the cold war and its impact on American society.  We will examine new scholarship that explores the intersection of the cold war and issues of consumer culture, sexual identity, gender ideology, militarization, and social movements, among others.

Tentative  Reading List:  

  • John Gaddis, We Now Know:  Rethinking Cold War History
  • Michael Hogan, Hiroshima in History and Memory
  • H. W. Brands,  The Devil We Knew:  Americans and the Cold War
  • Elaine Tyler May, Homeward Bound:  American Families in the Cold War Era
  • David Johnson, The Lavender Scare:  The Cold War Persecution of Gays and Lesbians
  • Thomas Doherty, Cold War, Cool Medium:  Television, McCarthyism, and American Culture
  • Mary Dudziak, Cold War Civil Rights

 

HIS 6939-905 “History of Natural Disasters”
Instructor: Dr. Joanna Dyl
Wednesdays 6:30-9:55
jdyl@usf.edu

This course will explore the history of natural disasters from the colonial to the modern era.  The course will focus on the United States, but some readings will cover disasters in Latin America and the Global South more broadly.  We will also read a variety of theoretical work on disasters drawn from disciplines such as geography and sociology, and we will ask how those theories can inform our historical studies.  The goal is a broad exploration of natural disasters across geographical, temporal, and disciplinary lines.

The course will consider questions such as the following:  Do “natural” disasters in fact stem from natural causes?  How have natural disasters shaped societies in different time periods and regions of the globe?  How have different societies adapted to and recovered from natural disasters?  Are some regions of the globe more susceptible to natural disasters than others, and if so, why?  How does the concept of vulnerability help us understand the impacts of natural disasters?  How do disasters affect cities?

 

HIS 6939- 906 “The American Museum”
Instructor: Dr. Philip Levy
plevy@usf.edu

In one case we see the bones of some ancient animal arranged artfully to invoke what may or may not have been a life-like pose. In another case are models of a man and woman standing against a painted background—their partial nudity is as titillating as it is educational. In a third case is an arrangement of prized objects containing great spiritual power. But the wise people who could use them properly are long gone—killed and displaced by the same nation state whose flag fly outside the building housing these cases. The bones of some of these same people are stored in boxes in the building’s basement. Once in a while scientists poke through them. Welcome to the American Museum—a place that is at once repository, public playground, schoolroom, laboratory, social club, work place, battleground, and horror show. This course scans the history of these odd entities to better understand the logics that have shaped them, the issues that define them, and the histories they have created and share. You will never peer into a case the same way again.

 

HIS 6939-907 “The Severans”
Instructor: Dr. Julie Langford
Wednesdays 6:20-9:55
langford@usf.edu

The focus of this course will be the period from roughly A.D. 138 to 240, from the ascension of Antoninus Pius to the fall of the Gordians.  Students will read ancient texts from and about the period that include a variety of genres such as histories, biographies, philosophical meditations, Christian apologies and ancient novels.  They will also learn to analyze and interpret ancient coinage produced during the period, both by civic mints that were operated by individual and groups of cities and by the imperial administration.  They will employ two numismatic databases created by a team of undergraduate researchers here at the University of South Florida in order to complete their investigations.  Finally, students will be taught how to engage with and critique modern scholarship on the period based upon their understanding of primary evidence.  Students will meet eight weeks to discuss readings, methodologies and the like.  They will then undertake a research project, the topic of which will be chosen in conjunction with Prof. Langford.  They will then produce a 15-20 page paper for undergrads, 25-30 for grads and present it before the class.  Students will also be encouraged to present their research at wider venues.

 

HIS 6939-909 “U.S. Immigration History”
Instructor: Dr. Fraser Ottanelli
Tuesdays 6:20-9:55
ottanelli@usf.edu

This graduate seminar explores the intricate connections linking the experiences of migration, work, international class solidarity, multi-ethnic labor organizations, and the development of national and ethnic identities. We begin with an overview of some of the recent work in, and a variety of approaches to, the field. Then, focusing on the years from the onset of mass migration at the end of the 19th century to the present, the seminar will examine 1) the forces that led to the decision to migrate; 2) the factors that determined who left, who stayed and who returned; 3) the elements that determined where migrants settled and why; and finally, we will investigate the different ways in which migrant workers in the United States reconciled their enduring ties with their countries of origin, negotiated their relationship with the labor movement of their country of adoption, and defined their place within their ethnic communities. By rethinking national and transnational approaches not as separate categories but as entwined levels of analysis, the seminar will “internationalize” the study of the history of migration and of the development of class and ethnic identity.

 

HIS 6939- 912  "Gender and Sex in Modern Europe"
Instructor: Dr. Tamara Zwick
Tuesdays 6:20-9:55
tzwick@usf.edu

This seminar examines a series of European historical works from the 18th to 20th century that place the categories of gender, anatomy, and motherhood at the center of their analyses.  We will begin with Joan Scott’s seminal essay, “Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis” and then turn to a series of monographs about gender and politics in late-eighteenth century revolutionary France and nineteenth-century London in order to examine our understanding of modern European political culture as well as the intersection of power, politics and sexuality. Next, we look at the modern economy in Ivan Illich’s decidedly quirky and original work about gender, industrial society, and the value of labor.  The remainder of the course moves to a series of analytical interventions about our basic understanding of anatomy and destiny in the West as posed by a series of authors writing about the history of the body and sex distinction. Finally, we will read about the destruction and creation of bodies in readings about the European Holocaust and the value of motherhood in the 20th century western economy.

Weekly discussion, writing, and a final original research paper will be graded with equal weight. Readings include but are not limited to the following list below:

Joan Scott, Gender and the Politics of History Joan Landes, Women and the Public Sphere in the Age of the French Revolution Ivan Illich, Gender Thomas Lacqueur, Making Sex: Body and Gender from the Greeks to Freud Judith Walkowitz, City of Dreadful Delight: Narratives of Sexual Danger in Late-Victorian London Anne Fausto-Sterling, Sexing the Body: Gender Politics and the Construction of Sexuality Londa Schiebinger, Feminism and the Body Ann Crittenden, The Price of Motherhood assorted scholarly articles

 

HIS 6908-015 “M.A. Capstone”
Instructor: Dr. Fraser Ottanelli
Selected Thursdays 02:00pm-03:45pm
ottanelli@usf.edu   

This course will act as the final participatory course work of graduate students before they proceed to the thesis writing stage. Non-Thesis Track M.A. students may also participate if they intend to compose a polished writing sample for Ph.D. program applications.  The seminar will be divided into four parts. In the first part, students will read secondary historical scholarship dealing with the practice of historical research. The second is a research and writing intensive part in which each students—working in close contact with their advisors--will write a draft chapter of their thesis or writing samples. The third part of the course entails circulating the draft chapter among the other seminar participants who will then provide typed evaluations assessing the strength and effectiveness of the chapter’s argument, its use of evidence, and its engagement with broader historiographical literature. Finally, students having received written peer and faculty comments, will revise the chapter by the end of the semester.

 

Recently Offered Graduate Level Seminars

HIS 6939  U.S. Race, Class & Gender
Instructor: Barbara Berglund
bberglund@usf.edu

U.S. Race, Class, and Gender is a Research Seminar.  This means that if, in another class, you have written a prospectus or proposal for a paper or if you have written a historiographical paper on a topic, this seminar is designed for you to take those building blocks and develop them into a full-fledged primary source based research paper.  You'll do this by working with me, your fellow students in the class, and in consultation with departmental faculty relevant to the project.  Class time will be organized around discussions of project organization and development, historical research methods and writing, the sharing of drafts and other components of the research paper, and presentations of research findings. The final product will be a primary source based research paper.  The class is open to MA and PhD students only.  To be considered, you must have a prospectus, proposal, or historiographical paper (done in a formal class setting) in hand and the topic must be on some aspect of U.S. history related to race, class and/or gender (any time period).  In addition, please keep in mind that since you will need to analyze primary sources for a successful paper, it is essential that the primary sources you plan to use are accessible to you. 

 

HIS 6939  Age of Jackson
Instructor: John Belohlavek
belohlav@usf.edu

The Age of Jackson (1825-1850) was a time of dramatic political, cultural, and territorial
change in the United States that was both nationalistic in scope, yet was also a harbinger
of sectionalism and approaching Civil War. The seminar will read monographs on all of
three major shifts, including the rise of the second major American party system (Democrats and Whigs) as well as the introduction of third parties.  We will also explore the emergence of reform movements, focusing upon social and moral reform, dietary movements, civil rights crusades, and utopian communities.   Finally, we will consider the physical expansion of the U.S. through the rise of "Manifest Destiny" and acquisition of Texas, Oregon, and the Southwest.       

 

HIS 6939  Society & Culture in Early Modern Europe
Instructor: Giovanna  Benadusi
benadusi@usf.edu

This seminar is both about empirical historical research and about critical approaches to history. It will pay close attention to historians whose works address important issues such as identity, the body, orality and literacy, the law, gender, community and family but it will also draw on a range of related methodologies and disciplines such as anthropology, semiotics, literary studies, and visual analysis. Emphasis will be on ‘culture’ as means of understanding and organizing the multilayered experiences of early modern Europeans, whether individuals or collectivities. 

 

HIS 6939  Gender and Modern Europe
Instructor: Tamara Zwick
tzwick@usf.edu

This seminar examines a series of European historical works from the 18th to 20th century that place the categories of gender, anatomy, and motherhood at the center of their analyses.  We will begin with Joan Scott’s seminal essay, “Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis” and then turn to a series of monographs about gender and politics in late-eighteenth century revolutionary France and nineteenth-century London in order to examine our understanding of modern European political culture as well as the intersection of power, politics and sexuality. Next, we look at the modern economy in Ivan Illich’s decidedly quirky and original work about gender, industrial society, and the value of labor.  The remainder of the course moves to a series of analytical interventions about our basic understanding of anatomy and destiny in the West as posed by a series of authors writing about the history of the body and sex distinction. Finally, we will read about the destruction and creation of bodies in readings about the European Holocaust and the value of motherhood in the 20th century western economy.

Weekly discussion, writing, and a final original research paper will be graded with equal weight. Readings include but are not limited to the following list below:

Joan Scott, Gender and the Politics of History
Joan Landes, Women and the Public Sphere in the Age of the French Revolution
Ivan Illich, Gender
Thomas Lacqueur, Making Sex: Body and Gender from the Greeks to Freud
Judith Walkowitz, City of Dreadful Delight: Narratives of Sexual Danger in Late-Victorian London
Anne Fausto-Sterling, Sexing the Body: Gender Politics and the Construction of Sexuality
Londa Schiebinger, Feminism and the Body
Ann Crittenden, The Price of Motherhood

 

HIS 6939  Contextualizing Plutarch
Instructor:  Julie Langford
langford@usf.edu

 

HIS 6939  Our Founding Fathers
Instructor: Philip Levy
plevy@usf.edu

It was Warren Harding who first coined the term “Founding Fathers” in 1916. Ever since then, the phrase has captured a distinctive American reverence for the odd assemblage of men who founded their republic. This seminar focuses in on how that reverence had taken form over the nation’s history. Rather than examining “the miracle in Philadelphia,” we will devote our time to the many and varied ways Americans have put the founders to use in their causes, politics, celebrations, and senses of self. We will read writing from a large swath of American history to look at why Americans have seen Thomas Jefferson as having been secretly in love with an enslaved woman, why American Nazis proudly proclaimed George Washington to have been “The First American Fascist,” or why the United States Senate passed a bill thanking the Iroquois Indians for their help with the Constitution. We will examine the places, events, and art that have celebrated these men and their era all with an eye towards understanding how the founders became our collective “fathers.” The course is rooted in early American historical literature and Public History scholarship and covers themes such as museums, public celebration, material culture, and historical landscape and memory.

 

HIS 6939  Modern Brazil
Instructor:  Scott Ickes
sickes@usf.edu

This is a reading, research and writing seminar that will cover the historical period (1870-1964) during which most of Brazil’s modern political, cultural and socio-economic dynamics took shape to make this emerging power such an extraordinary yet troubled modern nation at the onset of the twenty-first century. I have chosen readings and topics which focus on both change and continuity during this period, and on the experiences of particular social groups – urban African-Brazilians, industrial and rural workers, middle-class women – as Brazil underwent a process of uneven modernization similar to that throughout Latin America.

 

HIS 6939  U.S. Consumer Culture 
Instructor:  David Johnson
davidjohnson@usf.edu

This course offers a study of the historiographical literature on consumer culture in modern American society.  Although a subfield of history that has only emerged recently--in the wake of increasing emphasis on social history and cultural studies—it has already developed a rich literature and variety of approaches.  We will also look at the perspective of journalists and novelist on American consumer culture.
We will look at key moments and issues in the construction of a modern consumer society, such as the development of mass markets, advertising, and the department store. We will examine the relationship between consumer culture and identity and community formation. Is consumer culture—often equated with “mass consumption”—inherently oppressive to individuals and favorable to homogenization and standardization?  Can one’s role as a consumer be liberating or empowering? How is the experience of consumer culture affected by issues of race, gender, and sexuality?  What is the relationship between one’s role as a political actor (“citizen”) and an economic actor (“consumer”)?  How has purchasing or refusing to purchase impacted the power of particular communities?  How does using the lens of consumer culture change our view of the history of the 20th century US ?
In addition to these substantive and theoretical issue, we will also think about how one researches and writes about the history of consumer culture. You will acquire hands-on experience in producing your own original research project on a particular aspect of consumer culture.

Tentative Reading List:
Lawrence B. Glickman, ed., Consumer Society in American History: A Reader (Cornell, 1999)
William Leach, Land of Desire:  Merchants, Power, and the Rise of a New American Culture (Vintage 1993)
Susan Strasser, Satisfaction GuaranteedThe Making of the American Mass Market (Smithsonian, 2004)
Lizabeth Cohen, A Consumers’ Republic: The Politics of Mass Consumption in Postwar America (Vintage, 2003)
Thomas Frank, The Conquest of Cool: Business Culture, Counter Culture, and the Rise of Hip Consumerism
Robert Weems, Desegregating the Dollar:  African American Consumerism in the Twentieth Century  (NYU Press, 1998)
Dwight McBride, Why I hate Abercrombie & Fitch (excerpts)
Naomi Klein, No Logo (Picador, 2000)
Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club (Norton, 1996)

 

HIS 6939  British & Dutch Empires
Instructor: Case Boterbloem
cboterbl@usf.edu

This course compares the British and Dutch Maritime Empire in the seventeenth century. Why were the Dutch wildly successful in world trade between the 1580s and 1720s, and how were they eventually surpassed by the British? How did the Dutch and British look at cultures that they encountered in Asia, Russia, Africa and the Americas and how did those cultures treat the "Westerners," as can be gleaned from various source materials? How much was this still a "Middle Ground," and in how far could the European behave as imperial masters? And how did British and Dutch look at each other? Both the Hakluyt/Purchase series as well as the Early English Book Online database provide a wealth of materials to investigate this topic. The historiography on the economic political, military, social and cultural aspects of this topic is vast, and can be mined equally fruitfully.

 

HIS 6939  African-American History
Instructor: Steve Prince
ksp@usf.edu

This course studies the history of African Americans in the United States from the colonial era to the present day. Topics to be discussed include: the slave trade and the Atlantic World, the rise of the southern plantation system, slave agency and resistance, black life in the Antebellum North, the Civil War and Emancipation, Reconstruction, African American politics, gender and sexuality, the rise of Jim Crow, the Civil Rights movement (North and South), Black Power, Pan-Africanism, and the rhetoric of “colorblindness” in the modern U.S.

Tentative reading list: Ira Berlin, Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America; Walter Johnson, Soul by Soul: Life Inside the Antebellum Slave Market; Patrick Rael, Black Identity and Black Protest in the Antebellum North; Erskine Clarke, Dwelling Place: A Plantation Epic; Steven Hahn, A Nation Under Our Feet: Black Political Struggles in the Rural South from Slavery to the Great Migration; Hannah Rosen, Terror in the Heart of Freedom: Citizenship, Sexual Violence, and the Meaning of Race in the Post-Emancipation South; Adriane Lentz-Smith, Freedom Struggles: African Americans and World War I; Glenda Gilmore, Defying Dixie: The Radical Roots of Civil Rights, 1919-1950; Timothy B. Tyson, Radio Free Dixie: Robert F. Williams and the Roots of Black Power;  Nikhil Pal Singh, Black is a Country: Race and the Unfinished Struggle for Democracy; Robert Self, American Babylon: Race and the Struggle for Postwar Oakland; Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness.

 

HIS 6939   Colonialism & Culture 
Instructor: William Cummings
wcummings@usf.edu

This course offers students the chance to explore one of the most significant global historical development in the last five hundred years: colonialism.  The advent, creation, maintenance, fall, and enduring effects of colonialism have decisively shaped the modern world.  This seminar gets to the heart of the matter—What was colonialism?  How did it operate?  What consequences did it have?—through readings of a series of seminal studies that analyze colonialism in different places and times.

 

HIS 6939  Late Antiquity
Instructor:  Michael Decker
mjdecker@usf.edu

This class explores the history of the Eastern Mediterranean world from the fourth through eighth centuries. We will explore issues of:

  • Christianization
  • Communities and the production of history
  • Environmental catastrophe and the collapse of complex societies
  • the rise of Islam; Arabization, and Islamization
  • crisis and conflict in the communities of the Middle East in the fourth through eighth centuries

 

HIS 6939  U.S. Environmental History
Instructor: Joanna Dyl 
jdyl@usf.edu

This seminar will explore the environmental history of the United States from the time of settlement to the late twentieth century.  Environmental history is the study of the relationship between human societies and nature and how that relationship has changed over time.  That relationship is complex and reciprocal: the environment both reflects the influences of human activity and affects human history.  In this course, we will approach environmental history from at least three different angles: how humans have altered the land and ecosystems of the United States; how environmental forces and natural resources have in turn affected U.S. history; and how people have thought about nature and how those attitudes have changed over the course of U.S. history. Themes of the course will include how contests over the environment have reflected power relations and intersected with divisions of race, class, and gender and how those contests have often led to unintended consequences.
 

HIS 6939  War & Imperialism
Instructor:  Jack Tunstall
tunstall@usf.edu

This course will encompass the origins of the First World War, the era of the New Imperialism—1871 to 1914, World War I itself, and diplomatic, political, and military events in the various empires.  We will then study the Treaty of Versailles, as well as its effects on world history, emphasizing not only Europe, but the world.  For the First World War we will study the individual years, including military strategies, battles and their significance, the effects of technology on warfare, the various home fronts, and Allied cooperation or lack thereof.  We’ll also investigate such topics as the women’s role, financing the war, propaganda, the war as a background to totalitarianism, the Russian Revolution and civil war and its effects on the 20th century.  We will also study centralized government power expansion resulting in totalitarianism in Italy and Germany.  We will investigate the developments in the various empires, and the origins of the Second World War.  This will include pertinent events and the roles of the various empires, then the effects of World War II on decolonization.  This course will end with the Chinese Revolution of 1949, which spread the Cold War to Asia.