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Recent Seminars for the Doctoral Program

The graduate-level curriculum in our program is based on seminar-style courses that encourage student research and discussion. These small and intesive courses ensure that each student in the graduate program receives individual attention and guidance. As faculty will address the most cutting-edge topics and current research in their graduate seminars, the titles and contents of these courses will change from term to term. Ph.D. students will participate in seminar courses populated by graduate students only. Below, you can view a sampling of courses offered in current and previous terms.

** Please e-mail the listed instructor for permission to join the course.  Then forward correspondence to cebryan@usf.edu for registration permit to be issued.**

Fall 2016 Seminars for M.A. and Ph.D. Students

HIS 6112-904: “Analysis of Historical Knowledge”
CRN# 93259                        
Instructor: Dr. Fontaine
Wed. 6:00 - 9:45pm  SOC 255
dfontaine@usf.edu

This is a course designed to introduce students entering the history graduate program to some of the common methodological and interpretive issues involved in writing history. It is a course about history as a field of knowledge. This is not a course about one particular historical subject but instead spans time and place to explore some of the intellectual assumptions that inform the kinds of stories historians tell about the past.  Learning about the varied analytical tools historians have at their disposal will provide you with a foundation from which to think about, read about, and write about history from a more informed, sophisticated, and critical perspective. This course is required for all entering graduate students unless they have obtained a waiver from the Graduate Director.

 

HIS 6939/7939-011 ”Capitalism and Empire”
MA CRN# 87976     PhD CRN# 91111
Instructor: Dr. Boterbloem
Thurs. 10:00am - 1:45pm   SOC 254
 cboterbl@usf.edu
This course will investigate the emergence of European empires in the Early Modern and Modern eras and its link with developing global capitalism. Works discussed may include Immanuel Wallerstein's Modern World System; The First Modern Economy by de Vries and van der Woude; The Industrious Revolution by Jan de Vries; works by William H. McNeill; J.A. Hobson's Imperialism; and Lenin's Imperialism: The Highest State of Capitalism; as well as more specific studies of empire and capitalism in the Dutch Republic, Great Britain, France, Germany, Japan and the United States. Participants are expected to write a 20-25 page research essay studying the nexus of capitalism and empire in the history of one or two countries.


HIS 6939/7939-933   Society, Culture and Politics in Early Modern Europe (1400-1800) 
MA CRN# 94052    PhD   CRN# 94053
Instructor:   Dr. Benadusi
Thurs. 6:00pm-9:45pm  SOC 291
benadusi@usf.edu

This seminar is both about empirical historical research that focuses on place and time and about critical approaches to studying and writing history. In the past seventy years, historians of pre-modern Europe have abandoned the old Marxist idea that all social and cultural forms, relationships, and identities were dependent on and derived from the particular economic system of a given era. Instead, borrowing from different disciplines such as, among others, cultural anthropology, historical sociology, literary studies, visual analysis and feminist theories, they have argued that people collectively both shaped and were shaped by social and cultural forms as well as by the broad economic and political developments that characterized the period between 1400 and 1800. In the course of the semester we will place emphasis on ‘culture’ as means to understand how people, as individual and collectivities, negotiated and organized their multilayered experiences. We will also explore how emphasis on ‘culture’ has lead to a reevaluation of the broad historical developments of the times such as state building, colonial expansion and domination, urbanization, capitalism, scientific etc. Another important goal of the seminar is also to rethink pre-modern European history to include definition of ‘western,’ issues of otherness and the cultural processes of ‘othering,’ and hence to incorporate a ‘global turn’ into the discussion.
Graduate students who do not focus on pre-modern Europe should benefit from this seminar for its dual emphasis on critical approaches to studying and writing history and empirical historical research that focuses on place and time. I will provide the necessary material to those students who need to refresh their background in early modern European history.
Requirements: class discussion and participation; weekly one-page reaction or position papers; a final research or historiographical paper Examples of topics for weekly meetings: “Capitalism and Patriarchy,” “Meaning and Rituals,” “Community and Religion,” Creating Contexts/Breaking Boundaries,” “Self-Fashioning, Story Telling and Absolutism,” “Orality, Literacy, and Village Life,” …
Readings combine articles (uploaded to canvas) and books. These are potential selections for readings but students should not buy them yet:

  • Martha Howell, Women, Production and Patriarchy in Late Medieval Cities (1990)
  • Carlo Ginzburg, The Cheese and the Worms (1976; English 1980)
  • Pamela Smith, “Why Write a Book? From Lived Experience to the Written Word in Early Modern Europe” (2010) 
  • Robert Darnton, The Great Cat Massacre And Other Episodes in French Cultural History (1984)
  • Paula Findlen, Possessing Nature: Museums, Collecting, and Scientific Culture in Early Modern Italy (1994)
  • Dipesh Chakrabart, Provincializing Europe: postcolonial thought and historical difference (2000), selected parts.
  • Alix Cooper, Inventing the Indigenous: Local Knowledge and Natural History in Early Modern Europe (2007)
  • Francesca Trivellato, The Familiarity of Strangers. The Sephardic Diaspora, Livorno, and Cross-Cultural Trade in the Early Modern Period (2009)

 

HIS 6939/7939-931   “ Modern US in Global Perspective ”
MA   CRN# 94049      PhD   CRN#  94050 
Instructor:  Dr. Prince
Tues. 6:00pm - 9:45pm  SOC 254
ksp@usf.edu

This course is a readings seminar in modern U.S. History, circa 1865-present. As the name suggests, several of the readings place the history of the U.S. in a global context. Possible topics of study include: race and gender in comparative context, U.S. Empire after 1898, the rise of modern capitalism, labor strife, the global 1960s, popular culture, memory and public history. This course is suitable for MA and PhD students studying any period in U.S. History, as well as for students focusing on the modern history of other parts of the world, particularly Europe and Latin America.

 

HIS 6939/7939-936   “Atlantic Modernities”
MA CRN# 93575  PhD  CRN# 93576
Instructor:  Dr. Connolly
Mon. 6:00pm - 9:45pm  SOC 255
bconnolly@usf.edu

Twenty years ago, Paul Gilroy published his landmark work, The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciouness, in which he offered “a heartfelt plea against the closure of the categories with which we conduct our political lives…The history of the black Atlantic yields a course of lessons as to the instability and mutability of identified which are always unfinished, always being remade.”  In this course we will take up Gilroy’s challenge by placing the relatively new spatial heuristic of the “Atlantic” in productive tension with the old temporal designation “modernity.”  Is there an Atlantic modernity?  Are there multiple modernities, multiple Atlantics?  We will trace this problem across the uneven histories of the long nineteenth century, with attention paid to slavery, race, capitalism, and religion.

Potential Readings (Please do not purchase until the syllabus is finalized)
Paul Gilroy, The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness
Ian Baucom, Specters of the Atlantic: Finance Capital, Slavery, and the Philosophy of History
Edward Andrews, Native Apostles: Black and Indian Missionaries in the British Atlantic
Andrew Zimmerman, Alabama in Africa: Booker T. Washington, the German Empire, and the Globalization of the New South
Ada Ferrer, Freedom’s Mirror: Cuba and Haiti in the Age of Revolution
Laurent Dubois, A Colony of Citizens: Revolution and Slave Emancipation in the French Caribbean, 1787-1804
James H. Sweet, Domingos Álvares, African Healing, and the Intellectual History of the Atlantic World
Saidiya Hartman, Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route

 

HIS 6939/7939-010  “Medieval Egypt and North Africa”
CRN#  94819                                   
Instructor: Dr. Decker
Time: Tues. 2:00pm - 5:45pm SOC 255
mjdecker@usf.edu

 In Medieval Egypt and North Africa we will explore the period ca 400-1500 in Egypt and the Maghreb (western North Africa). Among the themes we will explore: the social and cultural history of Byzantine Egypt, Christianization and pagan responses, the rise of Coptic identity and its expression. We will also explore the arrival of Islam in Egypt and understand the political and social history of the early Islamic dynasties. When we turn our attention to North Africa, the main issues we will examine are the rise of Berber polities, Ibadi Islam and slavery, Berber cultural expressions and their interaction with Romano-Africans. Christian North Africa and its social and religious upheavals from the fifth century will also be examined. We will also study the arrival of Islam in the west and the cultural changes that accompanied it and relations between medieval North Africans and Latins and Byzantines. Among the authors we will read are selections of Egyptian and African primary sources, including al-Idrisi, Ibn Khaldun, Ibn Battuta, the Cairo Geniza, and papyri documents illustrating daily life.

  

HIS 6939-908 “History of Consumer Culture”
CRN   94565      PhD student - permission needs to be granted by Dr. Johnson
Instructor: Dr. Johnson
Tues. 6:00pm - 9:45pm  SOC 255
davidjohnson@usf.edu

This course offers a study of the historiographical literature on consumer culture in modern American society. We will look at key moments and issues in the construction of a modern consumer society, such as the development of mass markets, advertising, and the department store. More theoretically, we will examine the relationship between consumer culture and identity and community formation. Is consumer culture—often equated with “mass consumption”—inherently oppressive to individuals? (Reading Marx, Baudrillard and Anderson) Can one’s role as a consumer be liberating or empowering? What is the relationship between one’s role as a political actor (“citizen”) and an economic actor (“consumer”)?  How has purchasing or refusing to purchase been used as a tool by minority communities?  How does using the lens of consumer culture change our view of history?  Students will acquire hands-on experience in producing an original research paper on a particular aspect of consumer culture. Students interested in material and consumer culture from any time period or region are welcome.
Tentative Reading List:
William Leach, Land of Desire:  Merchants, Power, and the Rise of a New American Culture
Susan Strasser, Satisfaction GuaranteedThe Making of the American Mass Market
Lizabeth Cohen, A Consumers’ Republic: The Politics of Mass Consumption in Postwar America
Kathy Peiss, Hope in a Jar: The Making of American Beauty Culture
Robert Weems, Desegregating the Dollar 
Alice Echols, Hot Stuff:  Disco and the Remaking of American Culture
Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club
Dwight McBride, Why I hate Abercrombie & Fitch

 

Seminars for Ph.D. students only

HIS 7289-001  “Politics, Ritual & Identity
Seminar in Comparative Studies.

CRN#  94294                                   
Instructor: Dr. Ramos
Wed. 2:00pm - 5:45pm SOC 257
framos@usf.edu

This seminar is open to all graduate students, but is a requirement for all students in the Department of History’s Ph.D. program. Geared toward exposing students to interdisciplinary research, we will read an array of theoretical pieces of cultural anthropology and political science, as well as historiographical works related to the relationship between politics, ritual, and identity in a broad range of periods and regions.  Students will think about how these readings might enrich aspects of their research and will be asked periodically to bring in articles or book chapters related to the areas and periods that most interest them and that relate somehow to the theme of the seminar.  In the end, students will devise a research paper enriched by our collective readings and discussions. 

 

HIS 7937-012  Interdisciplinary PhD Pro-Seminar
CRN# 94139
Crosslisted with POS 6933 CRN 88212 and SYA 7939 CRN 87583

Instructor: Dr. Crawley
Tues. 2:00pm - 4:45pm  CPR 119

 

COURSES OFFERED IN PREVIOUS TERMS:

Seminars offered in Spring 2015 

HTY HIS 7939-917 CRN 23041
The US and the Global Cold War
Instructor: Dr. Irwin
Mon. 6:00-9:45pm  SOC 255
juliai@usf.edu
This readings course examines the history of the United States in the context of the Global Cold War, c. 1945-1990. We will analyze how international events influenced the course of U.S. domestic history during this period, considering such topics as McCarthyism, the civil rights movement, and the expansion of the U.S. military-industrial complex. We will also study how the U.S. government and U.S. citizens influenced the wider world—politically, economically, and culturally—during this period. We will examine such subjects as Cold War geopolitics, development and humanitarian assistance, Americanization and globalization, and U.S. responses to decolonization. The readings for this course are designed to prepare students for comprehensive exam fields not only in modern U.S. history, but also in other areas of the 20th century world. The major written assignment for the course, therefore, will be fairly flexible, and will be tailored to each student's specific research needs and interests.

 

HTY HIS 7939-906 CRN 21771
20th Century US Radicalism
Instructor: Dr. Ottanelli
Wed. 6:00-9:45pm  SOC 255
Ottanelli@usf.edu

 

HTY HIS 7939-905 CRN 23316
Popular Religion Medieval and Early Modern Europe
Instructor: Dr. Koenig
Wed. 6:00-9:45pm  SOC 254
annekoenig@usf.edu

 

Seminars offered in Fall 2014

HIS 7938-901 “Ph.D. Capstone”
Instructor: Dr. Fraser Ottanelli
Thursdays 6:00 - 9:45pm
Ottanelli@usf.edu

This course will act as the final participatory course work of graduate students before they proceed to the dissertation writing stage. The seminar will be divided into four parts. In the first part, students will read secondary historical scholarship dealing with the practice of historical research. The second is a research and writing intensive part in which each students—working in close contact with their advisors--will write a draft chapter of their dissertation. The third part of the course entails circulating the draft chapter among the other seminar participants who will then provide typed evaluations assessing the strength and effectiveness of the chapter’s argument, its use of evidence, and its engagement with broader historiographical literature. Finally, students having received written peer and faculty comments will revise the chapter by the end of the semester.

 

HIS 7939 - 902 “Early America”
Instructor: Dr. Levy
Mondays 6:00pm-9:45pm
plevy@usf.edu

Early America has been one of the most vibrant and theoretically creative subfields of American history. From the founding of English colonies to the events leading up to the American Revolution and encompassing all twenty six British colonies, scholars of early America have dealt with a wide range of places and eras and covered topics including European-Indian relations; the rise of slavery; colonial economies, processes, and conflict; questions of race, class, and gender; religious belief and practice; as well as landscape, the environment, material culture, and the written culture. No single class can begin to touch on all of the rich work that decades of scholarship have produced. Therefore, this class will be an introduction to some of the issues and concerns that have driven the field as seen through a mix of classic literature, and a main emphasis on current work. Students will have a shared reading for each week of class (usually a single monograph but occasionally a set of articles), and over the semester each participant will produce a total of three written papers responding to readings. This class is designed to built students’ understanding of the field and its discussions. Therefore, the emphasis will be on reading and in-class discussion as opposed to extensive primary source research papers. Response papers and class discussion of readings will make up the sum of our work. This class is ideal for students preparing for a comprehensive exam field, or for students to flesh out their understandings of American history or the Early Modern Era more broadly. 

 

HIS 7939 - 910  “US History: 1865-1920”
Instructor: Dr. Prince
Tuesdays 6:00 - 9:45pm
ksp@usf.edu

This seminar explores the history of the United States from the end of the Civil War to the end of World War I. Topics to be addressed include: emancipation and Reconstruction; wealth and poverty in the Gilded Age; federal Indian policy and plains warfare; European immigration and nativism; Chinese immigration and exclusion; the rise of American empire; popular culture and consumerism; gender and women's rights; Progressivism; and World War I. The course is recommended for students with a major or minor field in U.S. history since 1865, but it should also prove useful for students with other chronological and geographical interests.

 

HIS 7939 - 904 “Material Matters” 
Instructor: Dr. Benadusi
Tuesdays 6:00-9:45 pm 
benadusi@usf.edu

This course explores the social and cultural processes through which things -- from earrings to pottery, buildings to food -- became meaningful to early modern Europeans (15th-18th centuries). We will address a number of different issues such as the ways in which people’s need for things was created and/or shaped and the cultural relations of exchange through gifts, symbols and inheritance. We will also explore how modes of production and consumption not only shed light on people’s self-expression and collective identity but also on inequality. Material matters will be investigated in light of the remarkable changes taking place in early modern Europe: commercial innovations, technological advances, religious reformations, geographic explorations, the formation of states and colonial expansions. By viewing the production and consumption of material matters as a social process that involved multiple practitioners this course will show how and why material matters in the making of knowledge. Although Europe remains the focal point of discussion attention will be paid to the broader world. 

 

HIS 7939 - 903  “The Modern Mediterranean”                                     
Instructor: Dr. Fontaine
Wednesdays 6:00 - 9:45pm
dfontaine@usf.edu

This course will examine the fundamental role the Mediterranean region has played in the modern world from the late eighteenth century to the present. With the decline of the Atlantic slave trade and mercantile economies, Europeans shifted their focus back to acquiring wealth and influence in regions closer to home. Montesquieu’s Persian Letters and Napoleon Bonaparte’s disastrous invasion of Egypt in 1798 demonstrate to a small extent the development of a notion of Orientalism that would shape European perceptions of the Middle East and North Africa and henceforth justify European colonial expansion into these territories. Yet these territories were also central to the development of conceptions of modernity that have become fundamental to our understanding of modern European and global history, including ideas and practices of secularism, citizenship, identity and nationalism, and violence.

Each week readings and class discussion will focus on themes including (but not limited to) Enlightenment and Modernity; Religion and Secularism; Orientalism; Identity, Ethnicity, and Nationalism; Colonialism and Violence; Movement, Migration, and Globalization; Resources and Exploitation; and Revolutions. In addition to completing all assigned readings and actively participating in class discussion, students will be required to write short reviews/response papers to selected course readings and a final historiographical essay on a topic of their choosing related to the course.

 

Graduate Seminars offered in Spring 2014

HIS 6939/7939 Atlantic Modernities 1750-1900
Dr. Connolly
Tuesday, 2:00-5:45
bconnolly@usf.edu

Twenty years ago, Paul Gilroy published his landmark work, The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciouness, in which he offered “a heartfelt plea against the closure of the categories with which we conduct our political lives…The history of the black Atlantic yields a course of lessons as to the instability and mutability of identified which are always unfinished, always being remade.”  In this course we will take up Gilroy’s challenge by placing the relative new spatial heuristic of the “Atlantic” in productive tension with the old temporal designation “modernity.”  Is there an Atlantic modernity?  Are there multiple modernities, multiple Atlantics?  WE will trace this problem across the uneven histories of the long nineteenth century, with attention paid to slavery, race, capitalism, and religion.

Potential Readings (Please do not purchase until the syllabus is finalized)
Paul Gilroy, The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness
Ian Baucom, Specters of the Atlantic: Finance Capital, Slavery, and the Philosophy
            of History
Andrew Zimmerman, Alabama in Africa: Booker T. Washington, the German Empire,
            and the Globalization of the New South
Joan Dayan, Haiti, History, and the Gods
Laurent Dubois, A Colony of Citizens: Revolution and Slave Emancipation in the
            French Caribbean, 1787-1804
James H. Sweet, Domingos Álvares, African Healing, and the Intellectual History of
            The Atlantic World
Saidiya Hartman, Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route

 

HIS 6939/7939 U.S. History Research Seminar
Dr. Johnson
Wednesday, 6:00-9:45
davidjohnson@usf.edu

This course is designed as an opportunity for you to take a prospectus, proposal, or historiographical paper already completed and expand it into a primary source research paper. By the end of the semester, each student will produce a 35-page original, publishable research paper based on primary sources that makes a contribution to relevant historiographical and methodological debates in the scholarly literature. We will meet to discuss a few common reading on writing, archival research, conducting oral histories ,etc., and also to present, share, and critique work.  But unlike in a typical reading seminar, the bulk of the semester will be spent on independent research. The course is open to any graduate student in U.S. history--working in any time period and on any topic/subfield--who has a prospectus, proposal or historiographical paper in hand ready to expand and a desire to do primary source research and hone their historical skills.

 

HIS 6939/7939 Immigration and Ethnicity
Dr. Fraser Ottanelli
Monday, 6:00-9:45
ottanelli@usf.edu

This graduate seminar explores the intricate connections linking the experiences of migration, work, international class solidarity, multi-ethnic labor organizations, and the development of national and ethnic identities. We begin with an overview of some of the recent work in, and a variety of approaches to, the field. Then, focusing on the years from the onset of mass migration at the end of the 19th century to the present, the seminar will examine 1) the forces that led to the decision to migrate; 2) the factors that determined who left, who stayed and who returned; 3) the elements that determined where migrants settled and why; and finally, we will investigate the different ways in which migrant workers reconciled their enduring ties with their countries of origin, negotiated their relationship with the labor movement of their country of adoption, and defined their place within their ethnic communities. By rethinking national and transnational approaches not as separate categories but as entwined levels of analysis, the seminar will “internationalize” the study of the history of migration and of the development of class and ethnic identity.

 

HIS 6939/7939: Problems in Public History
Dr. Philip Levy
Tuesday, 6:00-9:45
plevy@usf.edu

Public History is a meeting place of many subfields, methods, and approaches all linked by sets of theoretical concerns and questions of audience and ownership over historical knowledge. Public History is also a rapidly growing subfield in the forefront of responding to challenges from within and outside academe. Its umbrella covers areas as diverse as memory, "uses." museum studies, commemoration, and looks to create output in both the traditional academic format and other more publicly accessible media. This class is a broad survey of current literature in the field with special attention paid to questions and conflicts over the ownership of the historical past. 

  

HIS 6939/7939: Research Seminar: European History
Dr. Giovanna Benadusi
Monday, 6:00-9:45
benadusi@usf.edu

This research seminar will help students make a realistic transition to research. Its goal is not to provide additional substantive material or methodological tools but to help students apply their cumulative understanding, theoretical knowledge, and research skills to a practical test. Ph.D. students will be expected to carry out a guided but independent project that will result into a primary-source based research paper or chapter of a thesis/dissertation. Students in the MA program will be able to go through the formative stages of proposal development and transform latent ideas into a well-structured researchable project. Most of the time will be spent discussing and peer-reviewing drafts of students’ writing. As part of the seminar we will also have a number of speakers coming in to present their research. Students will practice research skills by reading these speakers’ short papers beforehand and producing a signed, two double-spaced page review. At the end of the semester there will be formal presentations of the final product. Presentations are open to all graduate students and faculty. Close contacts with mentors are expected. Students are also strongly encouraged to attend (and read the papers for) the four presentations at “Works in Progress Seminar” organized by the History department, which is held on a Friday between 12:30 and 2:00. Detailed information will be distributed at the beginning of the semester.

 

HIS 6939/7939: European History: Medicine, Society, and the Body in Medieval and Early Modern Europe
Anne Koenig
Tuesday, 6:00-9:45pm
annekoenig@usf.edu

This graduate course is intended to be an introduction to the theories, practices, and meanings of medicine and the body in pre-modern Europe. The goal of this class is to provide students with a working understanding of the fields of medicine in Medieval and Early Modern Europe, as well as to give students a familiarity with some of the historiographic trends in the study of pre-modern medicine. This class will introduce students to intellectual traditions of medicine and to the relation of medicine to other intellectual traditions (e.g. natural philosophy, magic, alchemy). It will also explore cultural histories of medicine, paying particular attention to the relationships of medicine to religion, gender, and sexuality.

In addition to primary source readings and articles, likely texts include:
Luke Demaitre, Medieval Medicine
Monica Green, Making Women’s Medicine Masculine: the Rise of Male Authority in Pre-Modern Gynaecology
Marie-Christine Pouchelle, The Body and Surgery in the Middle Ages
Katharine Park, The Secrets of Women
Mary Lindemann, Medicine and Society in Early Modern Europe
Carlo M. Cipolla, Faith, Reason and the Plague in Seventeenth-Century Tuscany
Michael MacDonald, Mystical Bedlam: Madness, Anxiety and Healing in Seventeenth-Century England
Holly Tucker, Blood Work: A Tale of Medicine and Murder in the Scientific Revolution
Thomas Laqueur, Making Sex: Body and Gender from the Greeks to Freud

 

HIS 6939/7939: The U.S. & the Modern World
Dr. Julia Irwin
Wednesday, 2:00-5:45pm
Juliai@usf.edu

This readings course examines the history of the United States and its relations with the world from the turn of the 20th century to the present. We will analyze the ways that the U.S. government and U.S. citizens have influenced the wider world, politically, economically, and culturally. At the same time, we will consider how people and events outside the United States have influenced American domestic history. Topics include internationalism and isolationism; military interventions, economic expansion, and the spread of American cultural, religious, and social ideas; the role of state vs. non-state actors; and the ideology, rhetoric, and reality of “American exceptionalism.” The written assignment for the course will be fairly flexible, and will be tailored to each student's specific research needs and interests.

Ph.D. Seminars offered in Fall 2013

HIS 6939/7939-004 “U.S. Urban Spaces & Cultures”
Instructor: Dr. Barbara Berglund
Wednesdays  2:00-5:45
bberglund@usf.edu

This seminar on U.S. Urban Spaces and Cultures provides an introduction to the field of urban cultural history through a combination of intensive readings in secondary literature and primary-source-based research assignments for a West Tampa public history project. The assigned books and articles explore some of the varied methodological, theoretical, and topical approaches historians have used to interpret the meanings of urban cultural forms, spaces, and practices in U.S. society.  Readings traverse national regions and span from the nineteenth through the twentieth century.  West Tampa, a multicultural urban neighborhood, has been shaped by waves of immigrants since its founding as an independent city in 1892 (it was annexed by the city of Tampa in 1925). In the West Tampa public history project, you will explore and document this complex, yet understudied history through specific research assignments designed to use the same skills you typically use when writing a primary-source-based paper (i.e., good writing, careful research methods, cogent argumentation, engaging narrative development) but in a novel arena and for a different audience.  This should allow you to both sharpen your existing skills and build some new ones.  History graduate students only.
Contributes to fields in: Public History, America to 1877, U.S. since 1877

 

HIS 6939/7939-005 “The Atlantic World: Europe & The Americas 1492-1850”
Instructor: Dr. Frances Ramos
Tuesdays 2:00-5:45
framos@usf.edu

This course explores the field of “Atlantic history,” a term that has become code for scholarship focusing on either the African Diaspora or the impact of commercial networks on the eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century American revolutions.   Nevertheless, in the early modern period, people and ideas moved freely from ports within Europe, Africa, and the Americas.  People on both sides of the Atlantic shared similar beliefs, assumptions, and conventions, and the residents of seventeenth-century Lima had arguably more in common with the residents of Seville, Spain than with the people of the Andean interior.
Recently, intellectual historians have begun to carve out a place in the field with studies focusing on the diffusion and appropriation of ideas across the Atlantic and new studies continue to reshape the contours of the field of Atlantic history.  Students will familiarize themselves with this growing body of scholarship and in the end, produce a final project tailored to meet their own particular research interests. 

Contributes to fields in: Early Modern Worlds, America to 1877, Latin America

HIS 6939/7939-903 “Myth & Memory in U.S. History”
Instructor: Dr. Steven Prince
Wednesdays 6:20-9:55
ksp@usf.edu
“The past is not dead,” wrote William Faulkner. “It’s not even past.” As Faulkner recognized, historians are not the only people to lay claim to the past. Throughout U.S. history, Americans of all stripes have turned to history (or to their impression of it) in an attempt to shape the present and the future. Memory studies – one of the most significant historiographical developments of the past two decades – offers an important new avenue for historical inquiry. This seminar on “Myth and Memory in U.S. History” will explore many of the most important works in this field, while attempting to grapple with the meaning, significance, and limitations of memory studies. For Americans, the past has never been dead. It has always been a site of power, contestation, and debate. Topics to be addressed include: the memory of the American Revolution and the founding fathers, slavery and remembrance, the Civil War and the Lost Cause, World War II and the “greatest generation,” the Civil Rights movement, and more recent events including 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina. Selected comparative readings will tie course themes to larger global trends. In addition to assigned course readings, students will complete a “dehydrated research paper” on a memory-themed topic of their choosing. This seminar should be of special interest to students of public history and to those planning exam fields in U.S. history (both pre- and post-1877).
Contributes to fields in: U.S. since 1877, Public History

HIS 6939/7939-909 “U.S. Since 1945”
Instructor: Dr. David Johnson
Tuesdays 6:20-9:55
davidjohnson@usf.edu
This seminar will cover major historiographical work on political, cultural and social life in the United States since 1945.  It will examine the different ways that historians have tried to make sense of this period, using various analytical tools—such as race, gender, class, and sexuality—and various themes—such as militarization, rights consciousness, and consumerism.  Bracketing the cold war (covered in another seminar I offer), one of the major questions that emerges is what accounts for the rise of conservatism in the late twentieth century U.S.? As a readings course, it should prepare graduate students with a field in modern US history for their comprehensive exams.

Contributes to fields in: U.S. since 1877

Tentative Reading List:

  1. Michael Sherry, In the Shadow of War (Yale)           
  2. Thomas Sugrue, Origins of the Urban Crisis:  Race and Inequality in Post-war Detroit (Princeton)                                                
  3. Kevin Kruse, White Flight:  Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism (Princeton)
  4. Lizabeth Cohen, A Consumer’s Republic:  The Politics of Mass Consumption in Postwar America (Random House)                                    
  5. Robert Dean, Imperial Brotherhood:  Gender and the Making of Cold War Foreign Policy (Massachusetts)                                                
  6. Christian Appy, Working-Class War (North Carolina)
  7. Rebecca Klatch, A Generation Divided:  The New Left, the New Right, and the 1960s (California)                                                
  8. Sara Evans, Personal Politics:  The Roots of Women’s Liberation (Random House)
  9. Lisa McGrir, Suburban Warriors:  The Origins of the New American Right (Princeton)
  10. Jefferson Cowie, Stayin’ Alive:  The 1970s and the Last Days of the Working Class  (The New Press)                                            
  11. Nancy Maclean, Freedom is Not Enough:  The Opening of the American Workplace (Harvard)                                        
  12. Bethany Moreton, To Serve God and Wal-Mart:  The Making of Christian Free Enterprise (Harvard)

           

HIS 6939/7939-910 “Readings in Italian History”
Instructor: Dr. Giovanna Benadusi
Tuesdays 6:20-9:55
benadusi@usf.edu
Until recently, scholars regarded the history of early modern Italy (the centuries between the Renaissance and the age of revolutions) as one of fragmentation, isolation and decline, exemplified by the absence of a unified Italian state, foreign domination, and economic and cultural stagnation.  This interpretation has continued to influence US scholarship up to the 1980s as evidenced by a dearth of research on this period, especially when compared to the rich and vibrant historiography of the Italian Renaissance (1200-1500).  Viewing Italy as both larger and more connected internally and to the rest of the world, this reading seminar 1) will cover some of the most recent and stimulating works by both Anglophone and Italian scholars (when available in translation) on the political, cultural and social history of the peninsula during these “forgotten centuries.”  2) It will also evaluate the theoretical models with which historians operate, paying particular attention to analytical tools such as gender, class, ethnicity, and sexuality.  3) Finally it will offer an opportunity to develop skills in historical analysis and writing to prepare students for the comprehensive exams, regardless of their fields of interest.  Some of the topics covered include: processes of state building, the emergence of consumer-oriented urban society and economy, the spread of empirical and experimental practices and the advances of a new scientific culture, ethnic and religious trading diasporas, expansion and colonial imperialism, post-Tridentine reforms and missionary work, travel and the Grand Tour.
Students will not write a final research paper but a number of book reviews on the readings assigned throughout the semester.
Here are some potential titles but DO NOT BUY THE BOOKS YET!!!
Contributes to fields in: Early Modern Worlds

  1. Appuhn, Karl. The Forest on the Sea. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009.
  2. Biagioli, Mario. Galileo, Courtier: The Practice of Science in the Culture of Absolutism. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1993.
  3. Castiglione, Caroline. Patrons and Adversaries: Nobles and Villagers in Italian Politics, 1640-1760. Oxford University Press, 2005.
  4. Cavallo, Sandra. Artisans of the Body in Early Modern Italy: Identities, Families and Masculinities. Manchester University Press, 2010.
  5. Findlen, Paula. Possessing Nature: Museums, Collecting and Scientific Culture in Early Modern Italy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994. Paperback edition, 1996
  6. Gentilcore, David. Healers and Healing in Early Modern Italy. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1998.
  7. Muir, Edward. Mad blood stirring: Vendetta and factions in Friuli during the Renaissance. Baltimore. Md: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993.
  8. Trivellato, Francesca. The Familiarity of Strangers. The Sephardic Diaspora, Livorno, and Cross-Cultural Trade in the Early Modern Period. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009.

Ph.D. Seminars offered in Spring 2013

HIS 7939- 004 “Urban Public History”
Instructor: Dr. Barbara Berglund
Thursdays 2:00-5:45
bberglund@usf.edu
This course in Urban Public History has three distinct but overlapping and interrelated phases that combine reading in secondary literature, historical research, and experiential learning.  In the first phase of the course, we will read some key works in the fields of urban history and urban public history.  In the second phase, course participants will be divided into four work groups – each work group will be assigned to develop the content and script for one of four Downtown History Walks (Shopping Downtown, Martial Memorials, Early Tampa, and Illicit Tampa) planned in conjunction with the Tampa Downtown Partnership’s Do the Local Motion Program.  Since a skeleton outline of each route along with designated key sites will be provided, this will involve research in secondary sources in urban history and Tampa history as well as some primary source research in local archives in addition to numerous (often independent of class time) visits to the downtown area and walk route.  The third phase will involve leading the four walks on pre-scheduled Fridays during the month of April.  Typically the Do The Local Motion Program draws 60-80 people to each of their walks.  In addition to leading the walks, at the end of the semester, students will produce individual written and oral reports on the process of researching, creating, and delivering the walks and provide materials (scripts, routes, and historical background) to the Do the Local Motion Program in a pre-designated format.  Students must be available for Thursday afternoon class meetings, Friday walks in April as well as attending one or more additional Friday walks during the semester to get a sense of what to expect for your own walk, and travel to downtown and local archives.  History department graduate students only.

HIS  7939- 903 “Gender & Sexuality in Modern U.S. History”
Instructor: Dr. David Johnson
Wednesdays 6:20-9:55
davidjohnson@usf.edu
This course offers an in-depth examination of recent historiography in the subfield of the history of sexuality.  We will consider how popular, legal and other discourses concerning sex and sexuality have transformed throughout 20th century U.S. history. We will examine how notions of sex, gender and the family are not unchanging, natural essences but how they have developed historically; how they vary by race and class; how they have been affected by historical transformations such as urbanization and industrialization; and how they have become arenas of cultural and political contestation.
Starting with some theoretical work from Michel Foucault and his postmodern friends, we will consider the common assumption that the change in American sexual standards is best understood as one of increasing liberalization and explore what alternative explanatory frameworks historians have proposed.  How have categories, identities, and norms concerning sex changed over time? How did issues of gender and sexuality (abortion, gay marriage, sex education, feminism) come to figure so centrally in modern American political culture?
Tentative Reading List:

  • Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality: Volume I:  An Introduction (Random House, 1978)
  • George Chauncey, Gay New York: Gender, Urban Culture, and the Making of the Gay Male World, 1890-1940 (Basic Books, 1994)
  • Leslie Reagan, When Abortion was a Crime:  Women, Medicine and the Law in the U.S. 1867-1973 (California, 1997)
  • Joanne Meyerowitz, How Sex Changed:  A History of Transsexuality in the U.S. (Harvard, 2002)
  • Elizabeth Fraterrigo, Playboy and the Making of the Good Life in Modern America (Oxford, 2009)
  • Nan Alamilla Boyd, Wide Open Town: A History of Queer San Francisco to 1965 (California, 2003)
  • Whitney Strub, Perversion for Profit: The Politics of Pornography and the Rise of the New Right (Columbia, 2011)
  • Beth Bailey, Sex in the Heartland (Harvard, 1999)
  • Christian Luker, When Sex Goes to School:  Warring Views on Sex and Sex Education Since the Sixties (Norton, 2007)
  • Donald Critchlow, Phyllis Schlafly and Grassroots Conservatism

 

HIS 7939- 904 “Medicine, Science, and Empire”
Instructor: Dr. Julia Irwin
Tuesdays 6:20-9:55
juliai@usf.edu

**Note: This course meets the “Comparative Seminar” requirement. This seminar examines the history and historiography of empire through the lenses of science, medicine, and technology. Our scope of inquiry will be quite broad—we will consider both European and American imperial ventures in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, from the 18th century to the near present. Unifying these geographically and temporally diverse readings, however, will be their shared attention to the function of science in colonial and neo-colonial enterprises. In our weekly discussions, we will explore a number of related themes. These include (but are by no means limited to): the ideologies of civilization and modernization; shifting discourses on race, gender, and reproduction; the power accorded to Western scientific and medical expertise and its relation to local, indigenous forms of knowledge; the pursuit of both social and environmental engineering; and the usefulness of Michel Foucault’s concept of “biopower.” By comparing and contrasting these themes across time and space, we will develop a deeper understanding of the workings of empire in the modern world.

 

HIS 7939- 906 “Colonial U.S.”
Instructor: Dr. Philip Levy
Tuesdays 6:20-9:55
plevy@usf.edu
This course is large view survey of 40 years of early American historiography. It designed with the comps destined graduate student in mind and does not presuppose any substantive in-field background. Early America has been one of the most vibrant and theoretically creative subfields of American history. This reading-intensive seminar will explore how that creativity took shape as we read selected highlights to make sense of a wide range of places, peoples and concerns. The class will rest on core shared readings (monographs primarily) but will allow for more focused individually selected and needs based readings as the semester progresses. Writing will be historiographic and thematic and not based on primary research. 

 

Ph.D. Seminars offered in Fall 2012

HIS 7939-901 “Material Matters”
Instructor: Dr. Giovanna Benadusi
Wednesdays 6:20-9:55
benadusi@usf.edu

This course explores the social and cultural processes through which things -- from earrings to pottery, buildings to food -- became meaningful to early modern Europeans (15th-18th centuries). We will address a number of different issues such as the ways in which people’s need for things was created and/or shaped and the cultural relations of exchange through gifts, symbols and inheritance. We will also explore how modes of production and consumption not only shed light on people’s self-expression and collective identity but also on inequality. Material matters will be investigated in light of the remarkable changes taking place in early modern Europe: commercial innovations, technological advances, religious reformations, geographic explorations, the formation of states and colonial expansions. By viewing the production and consumption of material matters as a social process that involved multiple practitioners this course will show how and why material matters in the making of knowledge. Although Europe remains the focal point of discussion attention will be paid to the broader world.

Selected readings (do not buy these books before consulting with me)
Richard Goldthwaite, Wealth and the demand for art in Renaissance Italy (1995)
John E. Wills, Jr. "European consumption and Asian production in the seventeenth and
Eighteenth centuries," in Consumption and the World of Goods ed. John Brewer and Roy Porter (London: Routledge, 1993), pp. 133-147.
Robert Finlay, “The Pilgrim Art: The Culture of Porcelain in World History,” Journal of World History, 9 (1998): 141-187.
David Kuchta, “The Making of the Self-Made Man: Class, Clothing, and English Masculinity, 1688-1832,” (1996)
U. Rublack, Dressing Up (Oxford 2010)

 

HIS 7939-903 “American Cold War Culture”
Instructor: Dr. David Johnson
Wednesdays 6:20-9:55
davidjohnson@usf.edu

The cold war, the dominant paradigm in U.S. foreign relations for the late twentieth century, also profoundly affected American domestic culture—everything from civil rights legislation, to childhood education, to private family relations. It helped define the “normal” and the “patriotic” from the “deviant” and “treasonous.” Using a cultural history approach focusing on issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality, this class will examine the ways in which historians have studied the cold war and its impact on American society.  We will examine new scholarship that explores the intersection of the cold war and issues of consumer culture, sexual identity, gender ideology, militarization, and social movements, among others.

Tentative  Reading List:  

  • John Gaddis, We Now Know:  Rethinking Cold War History
  • Michael Hogan, Hiroshima in History and Memory
  • H. W. Brands,  The Devil We Knew:  Americans and the Cold War
  • Elaine Tyler May, Homeward Bound:  American Families in the Cold War Era
  • David Johnson, The Lavender Scare:  The Cold War Persecution of Gays and Lesbians
  • Thomas Doherty, Cold War, Cool Medium:  Television, McCarthyism, and American Culture
  • Mary Dudziak, Cold War Civil Rights 

 

HIS 7939-909 “U.S. immigration History”
Instructor: Dr. Fraser Ottanelli
Tuesdays 6:20-9:55
ottanelli@usf.edu

This graduate seminar explores the intricate connections linking the experiences of migration, work, international class solidarity, multi-ethnic labor organizations, and the development of national and ethnic identities. We begin with an overview of some of the recent work in, and a variety of approaches to, the field. Then, focusing on the years from the onset of mass migration at the end of the 19th century to the present, the seminar will examine 1) the forces that led to the decision to migrate; 2) the factors that determined who left, who stayed and who returned; 3) the elements that determined where migrants settled and why; and finally, we will investigate the different ways in which migrant workers in the United States reconciled their enduring ties with their countries of origin, negotiated their relationship with the labor movement of their country of adoption, and defined their place within their ethnic communities. By rethinking national and transnational approaches not as separate categories but as entwined levels of analysis, the seminar will “internationalize” the study of the history of migration and of the development of class and ethnic identity.

 

HIS 7980-001 “Ph.D. Dissertation Capstone”
Instructor: Dr. Fraser Ottanelli
Selected Thursdays 02:00pm-03:45pm
Ottanelli@usf.edu
This course will act as the final participatory course work of graduate students before they proceed to the thesis/dissertation writing stage. Non-Thesis Track M.A. students may also participate if they intend to compose a polished writing sample for Ph.D. program applications.  The seminar will be divided into four parts. In the first part, students will read secondary historical scholarship dealing with the practice of historical research. The second is a research and writing intensive part in which each students—working in close contact with their advisors--will write a draft chapter of their thesis/dissertation. The third part of the course entails circulating the draft chapter among the other seminar participants who will then provide typed evaluations assessing the strength and effectiveness of the chapter’s argument, its use of evidence, and its engagement with broader historiographical literature. Finally, students having received written peer and faculty comments, will revise the chapter by the end of the semester.

 

Recently Offered Ph.D. Seminars

HIS 7939  U.S. Race, Class & Gender
Instructor: Barbara Berglund
bberglund@usf.edu

U.S. Race, Class, and Gender is a Research Seminar.  This means that if, in another class, you have written a prospectus or proposal for a paper or if you have written a historiographical paper on a topic, this seminar is designed for you to take those building blocks and develop them into a full-fledged primary source based research paper.  You'll do this by working with me, your fellow students in the class, and in consultation with departmental faculty relevant to the project.  Class time will be organized around discussions of project organization and development, historical research methods and writing, the sharing of drafts and other components of the research paper, and presentations of research findings. The final product will be a primary source based research paper.  The class is open to MA and PhD students only.  To be considered, you must have a prospectus, proposal, or historiographical paper (done in a formal class setting) in hand and the topic must be on some aspect of U.S. history related to race, class and/or gender (any time period).  In addition, please keep in mind that since you will need to analyze primary sources for a successful paper, it is essential that the primary sources you plan to use are accessible to you. 

 

HIS 7939  Society & Culture in Early Modern Europe
Instructor: Giovanna  Benadusi
benadusi@usf.edu

This seminar is both about empirical historical research and about critical approaches to history. It will pay close attention to historians whose works address important issues such as identity, the body, orality and literacy, the law, gender, community and family but it will also draw on a range of related methodologies and disciplines such as anthropology, semiotics, literary studies, and visual analysis. Emphasis will be on ‘culture’ as means of understanding and organizing the multilayered experiences of early modern Europeans, whether individuals or collectivities. 

 

HIS 7939  U.S. Consumer Culture 
Instructor:  David Johnson
davidjohnson@usf.edu

This course offers a study of the historiographical literature on consumer culture in modern American society.  Although a subfield of history that has only emerged recently--in the wake of increasing emphasis on social history and cultural studies—it has already developed a rich literature and variety of approaches.  We will also look at the perspective of journalists and novelist on American consumer culture.
We will look at key moments and issues in the construction of a modern consumer society, such as the development of mass markets, advertising, and the department store. We will examine the relationship between consumer culture and identity and community formation. Is consumer culture—often equated with “mass consumption”—inherently oppressive to individuals and favorable to homogenization and standardization?  Can one’s role as a consumer be liberating or empowering? How is the experience of consumer culture affected by issues of race, gender, and sexuality?  What is the relationship between one’s role as a political actor (“citizen”) and an economic actor (“consumer”)?  How has purchasing or refusing to purchase impacted the power of particular communities?  How does using the lens of consumer culture change our view of the history of the 20th century US ?
In addition to these substantive and theoretical issue, we will also think about how one researches and writes about the history of consumer culture. You will acquire hands-on experience in producing your own original research project on a particular aspect of consumer culture.

Tentative Reading List:
Lawrence B. Glickman, ed., Consumer Society in American History: A Reader (Cornell, 1999)
William Leach, Land of Desire:  Merchants, Power, and the Rise of a New American Culture (Vintage 1993)
Susan Strasser, Satisfaction GuaranteedThe Making of the American Mass Market (Smithsonian, 2004)
Lizabeth Cohen, A Consumers’ Republic: The Politics of Mass Consumption in Postwar America (Vintage, 2003)
Thomas Frank, The Conquest of Cool: Business Culture, Counter Culture, and the Rise of Hip Consumerism
Robert Weems, Desegregating the Dollar:  African American Consumerism in the Twentieth Century  (NYU Press, 1998)
Dwight McBride, Why I hate Abercrombie & Fitch (excerpts)
Naomi Klein, No Logo (Picador, 2000)
Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club (Norton, 1996)

 

HIS 7939  African-American History
Instructor: Steve Prince
ksp@usf.edu

This course studies the history of African Americans in the United States from the colonial era to the present day. Topics to be discussed include: the slave trade and the Atlantic World, the rise of the southern plantation system, slave agency and resistance, black life in the Antebellum North, the Civil War and Emancipation, Reconstruction, African American politics, gender and sexuality, the rise of Jim Crow, the Civil Rights movement (North and South), Black Power, Pan-Africanism, and the rhetoric of “colorblindness” in the modern U.S.

Tentative reading list: Ira Berlin, Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America; Walter Johnson, Soul by Soul: Life Inside the Antebellum Slave Market; Patrick Rael, Black Identity and Black Protest in the Antebellum North; Erskine Clarke, Dwelling Place: A Plantation Epic; Steven Hahn, A Nation Under Our Feet: Black Political Struggles in the Rural South from Slavery to the Great Migration; Hannah Rosen, Terror in the Heart of Freedom: Citizenship, Sexual Violence, and the Meaning of Race in the Post-Emancipation South; Adriane Lentz-Smith, Freedom Struggles: African Americans and World War I; Glenda Gilmore, Defying Dixie: The Radical Roots of Civil Rights, 1919-1950; Timothy B. Tyson, Radio Free Dixie: Robert F. Williams and the Roots of Black Power;  Nikhil Pal Singh, Black is a Country: Race and the Unfinished Struggle for Democracy; Robert Self, American Babylon: Race and the Struggle for Postwar Oakland; Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness.